Archives for posts with tag: Tanner Roark

It was the worst of times–and the best of times last week. Well, actually–not the best because it’s tough to celebrate wins over the NL East’s AAA team.  But you get what I mean. And just remember the Nats lost two of three to Miami last month.  Nothing like three wins to put some wind back in the team’s sails and give one hope as they cross the first marker of the Major League Marathon (July 4th & 31st plus Labor Day are the other three of note-it’s not like Golf’s Majors where there’s a fixed set- some include the All Star Break as well).  The bullpen remains beyond as bad as anyone feared it might be (the team allowed 49 runs in the eighth inning over the first 50 games of the season) and its ERA has spiked to a mind-boggling and save-blowing 7.25.  As the Nats wind down May they find themselves closer to last place (4.5 games ahead of Miami) than first (nine behind Philadelphia). They entered their eight game stretch against the sub-500 Mets and Marlins with conventional wisdom being the Nats could/would/might win five or six to jump back into the race.  Entering the series finale with the Marlins they need a win just to break even.  Thank goodness the schedule continues to stay semi-soft in June.

 

Dissecting the Division- Philadelphia leads the NL East at 31-22 with Rhys Hoskins on fire (13 homers and 41 RBI) somewhat taking the heat off of their huge offseason acquisition.  They’ve also won seven of ten.  So has Atlanta-and the Braves are led by the power trio of Dansby Swanson, Freddie Freeman and Ronald Acuna Jr (each has 30+ RBI at this time).  The Mets are .500 thanks in part to their four game sweep of the Nats-and how about Wilson Ramos?!?  The former Nats catcher is hitting .270 with 31 RBI.  Nice for the 31-year old who had issues staying healthy while in DC.  The Marlins are looking great for 2022–and this week’s trade bait is Caleb Smith who’s posted six quality starts and an ERA of 3.05.  I’m sure Derek Jeter can find a willing taker for Smith that will yield a batch of forgettable prospects.

Harper’s Weekly- the former face of the franchise hit .179 last week, dropping his batting average to .227 (eighth among Phillies who had played in 20+ games this year). His 73 strikeouts lead the majors and put him on a pace of 223.  It’s a good thing the Phillies are in first place.

O’s Woes- the Nats’ neighbors to the north continue to go south, with losses in seven games dropping the Birds to big league-worst 16-37.  For those who don’t want to do the math, that’s a pace of 49-113.  While they might not lose a record 121 games this year, the Orioles are definitely capable of setting another infamous mark.  The pitching staff has allowed 114 home runs over 53 games this year, or on a pace of 348 that would shatter the current record by over 100 homers.  And you thought the Nats had it bad…

Last Week’s Heroes- Juan Soto hit 13-26 with 2 homers and 8 RBI, while Juan Gomes batted .400 with 5 RBI.  Anthony Rendon remains red-hot, scoring a team-high 8 runs while driving in 5 more.  As it’s Rendon’s walk year, the longer this team remains sub-.500 the louder the whispers of trading Tony Two Bags will get.  Patrick Corbin tossed a complete game Saturday (just what the beleaguered bullpen needed) and Max Scherzer tossed six shutout innings earlier in the week.  Matt Grace pitched two scoreless innings over three games. Somebody check his temperature.

Last Week’s Humbled- rookie James Bourque made his major league debut Sunday, allowing 4 earned runs over two-thirds of an inning. He’ll have no issues fitting in here.  The usually sharp Sean Doolittle coughed up a three-run double and a three-run homer to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.  Just to show it’s not just a bullpen thing, Kyle McGowin allowed five runs over four innings in his start Friday.  Trea Turner hit .212 with six strikeouts while leading off and Victor Robles batted .200.

Game to Watch- Saturday the Nats play Cincinnati with Eric Fedde (1-0, 2.18 ERA) starting; the early-season call-up has pitched well in spots this year.  He’ll face former back-end rotation fixture Tanner Roark, who appears to have bounced back to his 2014 and 2016 form.

Game to Miss- Tuesday Stephen Strasburg starts the series opener against Atlanta, but we’re going to watch the series finale of “Fosse Verdon”.  FX’s series about the legendary choreographer/director and his collaborator/muse has been an interesting watch (it’s no “The Americans”, but then again what is?  And can we all admit that Renee is a spy?)-but if there’s one issue keeping it from perfection it’s that they didn’t spend nearly enough time on “Damn Yankees”.  Once again, from the top…

Advertisements

This year’s Washington Nationals have never made things easy for us.  The sluggish start that turned into a memorable May before fizzling out in a summer of discontent.  The constantly playing tag with the .500 mark when the window of opportunity still existed.  The frustrating lack of moves at the deadline.  The slow slide from contender to pretender status.  The shedding of talent in August.  A September that’s seen the team play just well enough to stay hanging by a thread in the NL East (7.5 games back) and Wildcard (8 games) races.  All that’s left for this team is experiencing the actual moment of elimination and the chasing of milestones.

Bryce Harper:  three runs away from reaching 100 for the first time since the MVP season, two doubles away from reaching 30, three RBI away from getting to the century mark for the first time in his career.

Trea Turner: three homers away from getting to 20 and eight runs away from reaching 100-both would be career highs.  He’s one double shy of last year’s career high 24 and is seven stolen bases away from equalling the 46 tallied in 2017.

Anthony Rendon: one double away from tying last year’s career high of 41.

Wilmer Difo: three triples away from 10…although the way he’s hitting in September (.237) I’m not holding  my breath.

Max Scherzer: 20 wins is out of the question, but he needs just seven strikeouts to tie his career high of 284.

Tanner Roark: despite the nightmare season he’s one win shy of reaching double-digits.  He’ll likely have two more starts.

Stephen Strasburg:  two wins away from 10…with three starts left in the season. It’d be a nice way to end a year interrupted by injury.

Dissecting the Division- Atlanta leads Philadelphia by six and a half games with 13 games remaining for the Braves while the Phillies have 14 games left in their season.  The two teams tangle seven times over the final two weeks of the year, starting Thursday in Atlanta.  Meaning the division could be clinched by Sunday night.  The Nats have to hope for the Braves to bomb with the Phillies losing the bulk of the rest of their games–not an impossible order as we’ve seen both teams struggle lately.

Last Week’s Heroes- Juan Soto hit .393 with four homers and eight RBI…as the 19-year old passes his age with his 20th HR.  Spencer Kieboom hit his first two big league home runs.  Eric Fedde struck out nine over five and two-thirds innings.  Sean Doolittle tallied two saves and rode the bullpen cart.

Last Week’s Humbled- Max Scherzer’s drive for 20 wins ended when he allowed six runs over four innings against Atlanta…and prevented a potential sweep of the Braves that would put the Nats within seven games of the lead.  Sammy Solis and Jimmy Cordero cared 10+ ERA’s…again.  Adam Eaton hit .167 while Wilmer Difo batted .143.

Game to Watch- Friday the Nats host the New York Mets as Max Scherzer battles Jacob deGrom in a showdown of the top two Cy Young contenders.  Scherzer is 17-7 with a league-high 277 strikeouts and an ERA of 2.53;  deGrom is 8-9 with 251 strikeouts and an MLB-best 1.78 ERA.

Game to Miss- Monday the Nats begin their series in Miami with Eric Fedde dueling Trevor Richards:  the duo are a combined 5-11 (not to good) on the season and each has an ERA that’s well over four.  Enjoy “Better Call Saul”…

The Washington Nationals remain on the outskirts of playoff contention after another week where we saw this team at it’s most thrilling (an 8-7 win over Philadelphia with Ryan Zimmerman belting a walk-off home run) and its most underwhelming (three straight shutout losses).  The Nats may have won the aggregate-run week, 33-19, but after another 3-3 showing still find themselves a game under .500.  And while they’re not out of the NL East race just yet, it’s going to take one remarkable September to revive the team’s sagging postseason hopes.  Another week, another slow boil.

Double-Dealing- the Nats made a pair of waiver-wire trades, sending Daniel Murphy to the Chicago Cubs and dealing Matt Adams to St. Louis.  Murphy hit .329 over 342 games with the team and was arguably their best offensive player each of the last two years.  If not for a bad knee last fall and a glut that wouldn’t hold up in 2016,  Murphy could have won an MVP award.  Adams was second on the team in homers but had cooled off since the All Star break and was hitting .061 in August.  While Adams’ at-bats were dwindling with a healthy Ryan Zimmerman, Murphy’s absence gives Wilmer Difo the chance to prove he’s an everyday Major League second baseman.

Dissecting the Division- Atlanta (73-57) dropped two of three over the weekend in Miami, keeping the Braves eight and a half games ahead of the Nats in the NL East.  They host red-hot Tampa Bay twice this week before facing the Chicago Cubs for one game.  Philadelphia (70-60) has lost five of their last six series (the other being a miniseries split with Boston) and while their next six games are at home, they’re against the Nats and the Chicago Cubs.  If the Braves and Phillies both finish 16-16 (not out of the realm of possibility), the Nationals would need to go 25-6 to take first.

Wildcard Watch-  the Nats currently trail five teams in the NL Wildcard race; and those clubs have created a little separation between themselves and the second group of clubs currently playing tag with the .500 mark.  On the bright side, the Nats have the second best run-differential among Wildcard contenders.  On the not so bright side, the Nats’ 13-21 record in one-run games is the worst among those teams.

O’s Woes- at 37-94 a 100-loss campaign is all but a certainty (some can dream of a 26-5 finish, but I won’t)-so now we move on to the all-time worst record in Baltimore: the 54-107 crater of 1988 that began with 21 straight losses.  To avoid that this team has to go 18-13.  One wonders what this winter will bring for Adam Jones, Buck Showalter and Dan Duquette.

Last Week’s Heroes- Bryce Harper hit .304 with a team-high 5 RBI, while Adam Eaton led the regulars with a .381 batting average.  Juan Soto scored a team-high 6 runs…and kept a ninth inning rally alive with a two-out, two-strike double.  Ryan Zimmerman merely added to his legend with his 11th career walk-off home run.  Tanner Roark and Gio Gonzalez combined to allow 2 earned runs over 16 innings.  Max Scherzer struck out 10 over seven frames.  Stephen Strasburg is back from the disabled list.

Last Week’s Humbled- as a team the Nats were 1-for-17 with runners in scoring position during their three game shutout streak (first time in franchise history since they were the Montreal Expos playing in San Juan, Puerto Rico in 2004), leaving 18 on base.  They lost those three games by two, two and three runs.  In a race where they can’t afford to lose much more ground, those three losses (especially while getting solid pitching performances) were deadly.

Game to Watch- Tuesday Max Scherzer takes his 16-6 mark to the mound in Philadelphia to face 15-3 Aaron Nola–who outdueled Max just this past Thursday  Scherzer allowed a pair of hits but one was a two-run homer that was the difference.  Looking forward to the rematch.

Game to Miss- Saturday the Nats host Milwaukee…and it’s not the Brewers’ fault for not being a divisional foe.  Nor is it Jefry Rodriguez’ fault for not being a name-pitcher like Max, Stras, Gio or even Roark.  But September first is the first Saturday of the college football season (okay, there were games last week but really) and #23 Texas comes to FedEx Field to exact revenge against a Maryland team that had the gall to beat the Longhorns in Austin last year.  Fear the Hook’em…

On the surface the Nationals dropped four of seven to fellow playoff contenders Atlanta and the Chicago Cubs.  The way they got there is a microcosm of how frustrating this season has been for a team that appears to be less than the sum of its parts.  In three of the seven games the Nats’ bats produced six or more runs–and they won all three.  Three of those games were decided by two runs or fewer–and the Nats lost all three.  Including Sunday night’s come-from-ahead defeat at Wrigley Field.  While Ryan Madson hitting a pair of batters before giving up a grand slam was not ideal (especially with one of the base-runners reaching on an error), Friday’s loss was even more frustrating. Nine left on base after going 2-for-11 with runners in scoring position. Jeremy Hellickson walking the bases loaded in the sixth to secure a shower despite having a no-hitter going.  Greg Holland walking in what would be the decisive run in the seventh.  And Juan Soto getting picked twice off of first base in a one-run game.  These are the Nationals- a team that is 11-20 in one-run games.  As they trail Atlanta and Philadelphia plus five other teams in the Wild Card race, the little things become big over the final 44 games.  Can the team that has been admittedly sloppy for four-plus months finally turn the corner? 

Dissecting the Division- Atlanta takes a half game lead after blasting Miami 9-1 Monday afternoon. The Braves and Philadelphia are both within striking distance of the Nats in the standings, but the five to six game cushion has existed for some time.  And the longer the cushion stays in place the quicker it hardens.

O’s Woes- well, at long last the Birds have been officially eliminated from AL East contention and are assured of a losing record.  Their chances at avoiding a 100-loss campaign are dwindling (they need a 28-15 finish) by the day and the worst mark in team history (54-107 from 1988) isn’t too far away (they need to finish 20-23 to avoid that distinction).

Last Week’s Heroes- Ryan Zimmerman captured NL Player of the Week honors after hitting .476 with three homers and 12 RBI. Matt Wieters hit .353 while Trea Turner batted .345.  Max Scherzer struck out 17 while walking a pair over 14 innings and the Nats also got solid starts from Gio Gonzalez and Tanner Roark.

Last Week’s Humbled- let the record show that the bullpen is shorthanded, but Matt Grace, Wander Suero and Ryan Madson each posted ERA’s over six.  Same case with Kelvin Herrera who’s on the disabled list.  Adam Eaton hit .200 with eight strikeouts and no walks while Juan Soto batted .182 and got picked off first base twice Friday in a one run game.

Game to Watch- Friday the Nats begin a series with Miami, and while Max Scherzer takes to the mound in search for his 16th win of the year it’s also Hawaiian Shirt night at the ballpark.  Very, very tough to pass this one up.

Game to Miss- Saturday Tommy Milone pitches against Wei-Yin Chen in a duel of starters with ERA’s over five. Pool time is slowly but surely shrinking with Labor Day looming. Get a full day in the water if you can.

The Nationals entered the season as the team to beat in the NL East. But after posting losing records in April, June and July the Nats instead of being the pursued are the pursuers.  Yes, they still have 16 games remaining against Atlanta and Philadelphia but with every day a little bit of sand slips through the division hourglass.  They’re currently in a stretch of five games over three days thanks to the summer weather, and while the rotation appears to be finding itself Stephen Strasburg remains on the disabled list.  Like sands through the hourglass…

Let’s Make a Deal? Minimal movement at the non-waiver trading deadline for the Nationals who opted not to bring in a starting pitcher nor a catcher.  Instead they dealt middle reliever Brandon Kintzler to the Cubs for a minor leaguer.  The challenge to a team that’s played under its abilities for four months:  bring it.  Since that vote of confidence they’ve gone 5-1, which given the fact they played a pair of last-place teams is what they needed to do to stay relevant in the race.

Dissecting the Division- the Nats begin the week five and a half games behind Philadelphia and five games behind Atlanta.  Everybody’s schedule ratchets up a little bit in August as the Phils face division-leading Boston and Arizona, the Braves battle Wildcard contenders Milwaukee and Colorado and the Nats play their next 11 games against clubs with winning records.  Miami has taken a one-game lead over the New York Mets for the East Division Cellar…with both team’s offenses offensive in the wrong way. The Marlins and Mets are tied for 26th in the Majors in runs scored–and at least Miami is consistent in that the team that Derek Jeter blew up ranks 26th in team ERA.

O’s Woes- how will the Dog Days affect the Birds?  So far they’re 2-3 this month…which at .400 is actually an improvement of their full body of work (gulp!-.304).  They’re four losses away from clinching a second straight losing record and the O’s “Tragic Number” is six.  The Wildcard elimination number is 16—and that’s with Oakland not losing games to Seattle.  Last week saw multiple deals at the deadline as the Birds are in rebuild mode.  The final July haul:  14 prospects plus a major leaguer for five guys either with expiring deals or not in the long-tearm plans of the club.  The watered down bunch needs to finish 29-21 to avoid a 100-loss campaign, a tough task for a team that had just 28 wins at the All Star break.  A much more reasonable 21-29 finish means they avoid the worst record in team history (1988).

Last Week’s Heroes- Bryce Harper hit .476 with six runs and six RBI while Trea Turner tallied six stolen bases.  Max Scherzer struck out his customary 10 while Tanner Roark appears to have found himself, going 2-0 with a 1.29 ERA-which is impressive until you realize it took him less than a month to grow his hair and beard back after shaving in early July.  Those are mad skills.

Last Week’s Humbled- Shawn Kelley not only allowed a three-run homer in the ninth inning of Tuesday’s 25-4 rout of the Mets, but the reliever slammed his glove on the mound and reportedly glared into the dugout.  Unfortunately for the Nats front office that was enough as they designated the right-hander for assignment the next day.  Kids, nothing good comes out of a tantrum.

Game to Watch- Tuesday night Max Scherzer brings his 15-5 mark to the mound in search for his sixth straight victory.  In a year with an injury-mangled lineup and a scrambled rotation, Scherzer has been the one constant-with the exception of his April loss in Atlanta the righthander has been spot-on.

Game to Miss- Tuesday afternoon Jefry Rodriguez makes his fourth Major League start against Atlanta’s Max Fried.  While the Braves’ starter’s name is pronounced “freed” he’s off to a “fried” 1-4 start in 2018.  Smart fans should nap by the pool to gear up for the evening affair.

So much for a sweep of the last-place Marlins.  And then so much for a series win over the cellar dwellers.  After dropping two of three to NL Wildcard-leading Milwaukee, the Nationals once again missed out on an opportunity to pull closer to floundering Philadelphia and eroding Atlanta.  Once again this club wins its blowouts but botches nailbiters:  they’re now 10-18 in one-run games, third-worst in the National League.  Instead of breathing down the Phillies’ necks the Nats are assured of a third sub-500 month (the 20-7 May looking more like an isolated incident).  And not only are they chasing the Phils and Braves, there are also five teams between the Nats and the final playoff spot in the NL.  It was expected they’d be buyers (especially with the pre-emptive move to bring Kelvin Herrera aboard), but could the preseason World Series favorites possibly be in the process of shedding salaries?  Relievers Ryan Madson and Herrera are in the final years of their contracts, as are Gio Gonzalez, Daniel Murphy and-GULP-Bryce Harper.  Do the Nats dare try to get prospects/players for the Home Run Derby champ?  Tune in Tuesday at 4:15 to 103.5 FM in Washington.

Dissecting the Division- what’s frustrating about the Nats’ middling season has been the fact that the NL East is still theirs to win.  Neither Philadelphia (14-11 this month) nor Atlanta (9-13) are running away with this thing.  And both are under .500 since the All Star break.  Ten of the Nats’ 29 games next month will be against those two clubs…and one has the feeling that by this time in August we’ll know if they’re a contender or a pretender.

O’s Woes- back to back to back wins for the Birds?  Scoring 11+ runs in each game?  When did Don Buford and Boog Powell return to Camden Yards?  While there’s no more Zach Britton to not bring into extra innings at Toronto (sorry) nor Brad Brach to eat up late innings, there is Adam Jones who refused a trade.  As mentioned there’s also a three game winning streak, meaning the Orioles are over half way towards not posting a 100-loss campaign this year.  Can they go 31-25 the rest of the way?  They are 4-5 since the All Star break.  Compared to the rest of the season, they’re skyrocketing.

Hall Swing and a Miss- all eyes were on Cooperstown Sunday when Baseball’s Hall of Fame added six…and because there was a full plate of games it felt like an afterthought.  Unlike the Pro Football HOF–which inducts its new class in mid-summer and the Basketball HOF which adds its newest class the week after Labor Day, baseball honors its best in midseason.  Making one wonder why they don’t move the ceremony to the All Star Break…you know, when there are no other games going on and there’s a major news vacuum.

Last Week’s Heroes- Tanner Roark dug deep and struck out 11 over 8 innings to notch his first win since early June–one will be paying attention to see if this is something that will be sustained.  Max Scherzer merely struck out 11 while winning his MLB-best 14th of the season…while going 1-2 at the plate with a run scored.  Juan Soto led the team with 3 homers and 6 runs scored while Bryce Harper paced the club with 6 RBI.

Last Week’s Humbled- Mark Reynolds hit .077 (for the record Matt Reynolds got a hit in his lone at-bat last week).  Meanwhile, Wilmer Difo, Matt Wieters and Michael A. Taylor each hit under .200.  A lineup can survive one crater, but not three or four.  Jeremy Hellickson had a rough start Sunday, but even if he pitched well it’s rather difficult to allow fewer than the zero runs the Nats put on the board that day.

Game to Watch- Thursday Max Scherzer goes for his 15th win of the season by pitching against Cincinnati.  Remember the Reds and how woeful they looked opening weekend when the Nats blasted them to bits?  Since the end of May, the Reds are 28-21 while the Nationals are 19-30.

Game to Miss- Sunday Tanner Roark starts against the Reds in the series finale…but the Citi Open Tennis Finals are slated to start at 12:30 p.m. (weather permitting).  Not to mention the season four premiere of “Better Call Saul” in the evening.  Keep your sunroof closed–just in case.

These are interesting times.  Another weird week is over as the Nationals get swept and then almost pull off a sweep of their own.  One crazy comeback, one walk-off homer and one offensive extravaganza all in one series.  And that was supposed to be the back-burner to the clash of contenders.  Yet after all of the chills, thrills, spills and meetings– the Nats remain five games back in the NL East.  Exactly where they were one week ago. Rinse and repeat.

Meetings and Comebacks- the Nats after getting swept by Boston (not the worst thing given the Red Sox own the best record in the bigs) the team called the famed “players-only meeting”.  We’ve seen these not work out with alarming lack of success, and after trailing last-place Miami 9-0 the next day it appeared as we were only a Jonathan Papelbon choke-hold away from the classic Nats title defense implosion.  Only Trea Turner turned it on with a solo homer in the fourth inning.  You could say that was the genesis of the comeback as that put the team on the board.  And then Turner turned it on again with an RBI grounder in the fifth, a grandslam in the sixth and finally a two-run single in the seventh.  The 14-12 win was the biggest comeback in Washington Nationals history…and if there is an October July 5th will be a date circled on many fans’ calendars.

All Stars- Max Scherzer and Bryce Harper make their sixth appearances in the upcoming midsummer classic while Sean Doolittle gets his second invitation (he made the 2014 game while with Oakland).  Trea Turner could still make the squad as he’s one of five NL players in the “Final Vote”.  Anthony Rendon finishes out of the mix probably because of the early time he missed to injury.

Dissecting the Division- Atlanta and Philadelphia are tied for the NL East lead…and both have a good chance to keep their respective five game cushions over the Nats.  The Braves after losing four of five are home this week to face sub-500 Toronto and an Arizona team that’s dropped seven of ten.  Philadelphia’s on the road but plays four games against the Mets, three at Miami, and a make-up game with the Orioles (three of the bottom five teams in the majors).  The race at the bottom of the division is becoming just as entertaining as the Mets and Marlins are separated by one game.

O’s Woes- an 0-6 week drops the Birds to 24-65, meaning that in order to avoid their first 100-loss campaign in 30 years they’d need to sustain a 39-34 finish.  The Orioles haven’t been five games over .500 since May 26th…of last year.  The “tragic number” counting down their elimination reaches 36…and it doesn’t get any easier with four games against the New York Yankees over the next three days.

Last Week’s Heroes- Mark Reynolds not only hit .625;  the infielder belted a walk-off homer Friday night, notched 10 RBI Saturday and tossed one-third inning of relief Sunday.  Michael A. Taylor goes 7-for-15 at the plate while Trea Turner tallied and 8 RBI game in Thursday’s comeback.  Sean Doolittle notched a save and a win while tossing two scoreless innings while Max Scherzer tallied his first win over a month.

Last Week’s Humbled- Tanner Roark shaved his beard into a Chester A. Arthur getup before going with the full shave…to no avail.  The righthander went 0-2 while allowing 13 runs over 11 innings.  In doing so he dropped to 3-11 on the year…tying his career high for losses in a season.  Nobody was expecting Roark to win 20 games this year, but the fact that the previously reliable starter is floundering is cause for concern as we approach the dog days of summer.  Especially with Stephen Strasburg still on the shelf.

Game to Watch- Thursday the Nats visit the New York Mets, and Max Scherzer takes his 11-5 mark to the mound against Steven Matz (3.31 ERA).  Max currently leads the majors in strikeouts with 177, is tied for fourth with 11 wins and ranks sixth in MLB with a 2.33 ERA.  Must-see TV on Thursday.

Game to Miss- Friday is Tanner Roark’s turn and the Mets have yet to designate a starter.  It’s rough seeing Roark go through the year he’s had so far…and one wonders if, how and when he’ll be able to turn 2018 around.  I’m okay with skipping this baby step back to normalcy…or (heaven forbid) another tough outing.