Archives for posts with tag: NFC East

The official attendance figure at FedEx Field was 61,459–although if we’re playing the “Price is Right” game I’m going to say it was more like 41,596.  The other number of note was 9-0, as the Redskins fell to San Francisco in the rain.  It was also Alumni Day, which we repeat IS NOT HOMECOMING as the franchise recognized former players who came back home.  Instead of the lineup this year, former Redskins gathered by the decade of service.  I’m just glad that former assistant coach Kyle Shanahan didn’t try to stand with the 2010’s alums.  Or bring his father, who certainly qualifies as a Redskins alumnus.  Instead–Kyle gave his dad the game ball.

The Case Against Keenum- proof that while figures do not lie, liars do figure.  A 91.3 passer rating looks impressive-until you realize that the 9 for 12 was built on short throws with a long gain of 19 yards.  The Skins averaged under nine yards per completion–and with sacks taken into consideration managed 3.3 yards per pass play.

Grinding on the Ground- Adrian Peterson began the day with a bang, getting the ball on the first seven plays from scrimmage. He’d post 49 yards on 8 carries before finishing with 81 yards on 20 tries, meaning after that first possession the veteran was held to 32 yards on 12 attempts.  He also got stuffed on a fourth and one, and fumbled in the second half to set up a San Francisco scoring drive.

McLovin McLaurin- Terry had just two targets on the afternoon, making one catch for 11 yards.  The rain really reined in the passing game; Steven Sims made a team-high three receptions went for a combined five yards–all on third down.

Third and Wrong- the Skins converted on just 3 of 9 attempts, with seven runs and two pass plays called.  Keenum was sacked twice and completed 4 of 7 passes for two conversions. Peterson ran the ball twice, moving the chains once.  As mentioned, Sims was the top target.  Yardage Breakdown: 1-1 in short yardage, 0-5 in medium (4 to 6 yards needed), 2 for 3 in long yardage situations.

D earns a rain-assisted B- they shut out the number three offense in the NFL for the first thirty minutes and held Joey Garoppolo to a passer rating of 59.8.  But when they needed to make stops after intermission, the Skins couldn’t keep the Niners out of field goal range.  San Francisco scored the final three times they had the football.  The Redskins didn’t break, but they bent enough to come up short.   Matt Ioannidis led the team with nine tackles, Noah Spence had one sack, and Troy Apke notched an interception.

Special Situations- Dustin Hopkins missed a 39-yard field goal in the wind and rain, while Tress Way averaged 49.5 yards per punt.  There were no disasters in the return game, although Richie James Jr. did have punt returns of 13 and 17 yards.

Flying Flags- seven penalties for 47 yards, giving the team 58 for the season-third most int the league.  The five on offense featured three holds (two on Brandon Scherff) and two false starts.  The two defensive flags were illegal hands and pass interference.  Their 18 offensive holds this year is tied for the most in the NFL, while the 10 false starts are eighth most in the league.  What’s additionally disturbing is back to back penalties, something that happened once in each half.  The most costly flag?  A first quarter hold on Scherff that turned a 3rd & 8 into a 2nd & 18, helping push the Skins back from the Niners 21 to the 31 before missing a 39-yard field goal.

Dissecting the Division- how ’bout them Cowboys?  Dallas’ 37-10 win over Philadelphia gives them a 4-3 record and first place in the NFC East, as well as ownership of the #4 seed.  Philadelphia (3-4) is in second place of the division and is 11th in the NFC.  The New York Giants (2-5) are in third place while holding down the #14 spot in the conference. The 1-6 Redskins are in last place of both the East and the NFC, thanks to Atlanta owning a better conference record.

West is Best- the NFC West owns an 18-8-1 composite record, best of the league’s quartets.  The AFC North brings up the rear at 9-17, but the NFC East is not far behind (or ahead, depending on your perspective) at 10-18.  The NFC owns a 20-11 mark against the AFC in the highly useless interconference contest.

Blame the Nationals playoff run.  Blame the ongoing college football season plus the start of mens’ and womens college basketball, plus the NHL opener and the NBA’s preseason.  Somehow on the way to documenting what went right and wrong in the Redskins’ 24-3 loss to the New York Giants the Skinsanity got lost in the shuffle.  Because how they fared on third down (both offensive and defensive units rank 31st in the NFL) and which penalties hurt them the most (45 flags over five weeks has the team as the third-most whistled unit in the league) is such a micro thing.  Those are fundamental flaws in a team, but those are bad fruits that are the byproduct of poor soil and worse gardening.

So over the last weeks after watching this team play that way I tried to crank out the usual analysis, but each post died amidst busy days at the ballpark and voting for All-Big Ten and Top 25 polls.  The failed flights are below; consider this a “director’s cut”…:

 

“This just in:  the Redskins are going nowhere.  The 0-4 Burgundy and Gold mess are headed to another last place finish in the NFC East, barring disasters elsewhere.  Sunday’s 24-3 loss to the New York Giants extinguished whatever remaining playoff hopes there were, and who knows how bad things will get between now and the end of the season.”

 

“For those hoping for an October surprise Sunday, you should have turned your TV off after Cam Sims’ 65-yard touchdown run. Just like you should have moved on after Vernon Davis’ 48-yard TD catch against Philadelphia and Adrian Peterson’s triumphant one-yard plunge against Dallas.  But in the NFL, they play a full 60 (sometimes more) and once again the Burgundy and Gold glass is far from half-full.  The 33-7 loss to New England results in an 0-5 start as well as a coaching change; Jay Gruden leaves having lost 11 of his last 12 games.”

 

Okay, now we’re past that.  What now?  Bill Callahan takes over on an interim basis; he’s the first to be in that post here since Terry Robiskie took over for Norv Turner.  While you could argue that the 2000 Redskins were close to contention, as all six losses were one-possession affair, this year’s team is nowhere near respectable.  Even the Eagles loss looked closer than it actually was because of a garbage-time touchdown. This team is in meltdown mode, even judged against other meltdowns this century: Jim Zorn’s 4-12 disaster started the year 2-2 and Mike Shanahan’s 3-13 farewell was 3-5 at one point.  This year’s club could have a date with 2-14 or 1-15 destiny.

Meanwhile, the failed Gruden regime gets buried under an avalanche of losses.  If one takes away his period of adustment (a 4-12 rookie season in 2014) and Gruden’s final 16 game stretch (4-12 as well-how symmetrical!), the team went 25-25-1.  And yes, I count the playoff loss to Green Bay- after all, it was the high-water mark of the era.  What was in 2016 the most stable coach-quarterback combination in the NFC East (https://wtop.com/washington-redskins/2016/09/redskins-new-identity-continuity/) didn’t take long to unravel, and the familiar coach & quarterback carousel is back.

But the quarterback & head coach are merely hood ornaments;  one wonders how long the engine of the current Redskins regime stays in Ashburn.  Bruce Allen came to the franchise almost ten years ago with promises of accountability and a rescue from the Vinny Cerrato era/error.  Just like the peasants who cheer the departure of one ruler, Redskins fans had no idea that Allen would oversee a decade where the team would get worse, as in 59-89-1.  As in currently the fourth-worst mark in the NFL this decade (during a decade dominated by Vinny, the Skins were a robust 71-92, good enough for 23rd).  As in the only franchises who have been worse this decade have been Tampa Bay, Jacksonville and Cleveland.

Allen is reportedly working on getting a new stadium deal for the franchise;  as the FedEx Field fiasco is one of the factors that has turned this team from one that dominated the district into a squad that regularly plays at home in front of opposing fans-dominated stands, this is the silver bullet (Coors Light reference not intended) just like the return of Joe Gibbs in 2004 was the Burgundy and Gold bullet that undid previous miss-steps.  But he’s also in charge of the football operations, and for the last decade we’ve seen that patient suffer on the operating table.

Will they fix this mess?  The immediate road ahead is a nightmare.  After a trip to Miami their pre-bye week foes are a combined 11-3.  After the hiatus, the Skins face just a pair of teams that currently have losing records (the New York Jets and Giants).  Back to the Dolphins- this 0-4 team isn’t just bad, they’re Tampa Bay Buccaneers 1976 bad.  The team that can’t even wear the right color of aqua or position its dolphin correctly on the helmet ranks 32nd in the NFL in scoring, points and yards allowed, rushing offense and defense, offensive and defensive passing efficiency, sacks for and third down defense.  They rank 31st in total passing and total offense as well as passing defense.  A loss would tempt many to clamor for relegating the Redskins into the CFL or something.  Hail…

 

 

 

Somebody has to start 0-2.  Actually, nine NFL teams (over 25% of the league) began the regular season with two straight losses.  The Redskins are one of those teams, and after Sunday’s 31-21 loss to Dallas the faithful find themselves wondering how bad this year might get- or if the sorry start is simply a byproduct of playing two playoff teams from last year.  Once again a strong start fades in the early afternoon sun.  Once again a garbage-time touchdown makes the game seem closer than it actually is.  What will become of this less than ideal beginning to the season?

The Case for Keenum- the quarterback didn’t throw for 380 yards like he did in week one (the biggest opening day for a Skins QB since Brad Johnson in 1999), completing 26 of 37 passes for 221 yards and 2 touchdowns.  A lot of short stuff.

Running Aground- Adrian Peterson was active this week, and gained 25 yards on 10 carries (or seven yards better than Derrius Guice ran for against the Eagles).  Over two games the Skins have managed just 75 yards rushing.  That’s good enough for 30th in the league.

Better to Receive- one of the bright spots of the early season, Terry McLaurin, backed up his dynamic debut by notching 5 catches for 62 yards;  the rookie is now on pace to make 80 receptions for 1496 yards and 16 TD.

Third and Sour- the Skins converted 2-9, and went 0-3 in the second half.  Nine pass plays saw Keenum complete 5 of 8 passes while getting sacked once.  The top target was Trey Quinn (3 targets, one catch & conversion) while every pass was short left (2), right (3) or center (3).  Yardage breakdown: 1-4 on one to three yards needed, 1-2 on four to six yards needed, and 0-3 on seven or more yards needed.

Disappointing Defense- Landon Collins led the team with 12 tackles, and the disturbing trend is that three of the top four tacklers were defensive backs.  The defense once again coughed up more points in the second half than the first, and once again had issues getting off the field to a greater degree after intermission (Dallas went 4-5 after going 3-6 in the first half).  So far this year the Redskins’ foes are 12-15 on third down in the second half after going 6-13 before the break.

Flying Flags- the Skins were whistled 6 times for 44 yards.  Four on offense and two on defense.  Three offensive holds, a false start, a roughing the passer and a defensive hold.  Brandon Scherff had a pair of holds to lead the way.  The most costly flag was the second hold against Scherff, turning a 1st & 10 on the Cowboys’ 35 to a 1st & 15 on the 48.  It pushed the Skins out of field goal range and stalled the drive.

Dissecting the Division- Dallas due to its 2-0 start leads the NFC East, with 1-1 Philadelphia one game back.  The New York Giants own the conference record tiebreaker and are currently in third place, while the Skins occupy the East cellar and are at the bottom of the NFC.

West remains Best- the NFC West is 6-1-1 to start the year, including multiple wins by Pacific time zone teams in games beginning at 10 a.m. EDT.  The NFC East is 3-5 to start the season.

Just when you thought the Skinsanity of Seasons Past was strictly a thing of the past, the Burgundy and Gold go ahead and put their fan base on panic and anxiety mode.  The team’s come-from-ahead 32-27 loss (but they covered the 10.5 point-spread) saw plenty of possibilities before getting smacked in the face with the realities of this team and franchise in 2019.  They went toe to toe with the division’s most recent Super Bowl champ, but find themselves lacking in the end.  All while stirring up a hornet’s nest of locker room ire.  Welcome back…

Running Back Roulette- after years of quarterback controversies, it’s nice to see the team diversify this fall.  Adrian Peterson (1,000+ yards last year) was inactive for a game where Derrius Guice made his regular season debut.  Even Rex Grossman was active when Robert Griffin III made his debut in 2012.  While Peterson sat quietly in sweats, the Skins ran for 28 yards on 13 carries with Guice gaining 18 on 10 tries.  In addition, Guice went to the medical tent during the game-saying that “nature was calling”. Evidently “nature calling” meant “the knee that didn’t suffer a torn ACL last year was bothering him”.  An MRI later puts a dark cloud over the position.   And we’ve only just begun…

The Case for Keenum- this year’s quarterback threw for 380 yards, the most for a Redskin in a season opener since Brad Johnson in 1999.  His ceiling appears to be higher than anything that existed for Alex Smith, and even though many feel the 31-year old is a stop gap until Dwayne Haskins gets up to speed it’s nice to see the passing game in good hands. 

Catching Fire- a lot has been made of Josh Doctson’s inability to stay healthy as a rookie while producing in the years since.  Sunday rookie Terry McLauirin grabbed 5 passes for 125 yards and a touchdown, giving him in one game more 100-yard receiving efforts than Doctson did in his entire time here.  Last year’s rookie flash Trey Quinn added 4 catches for 33 yards and a TD, and ageless veteran Vernon Davis notched 4 receptions for 59 yards and the game’s first score.  A big catch for Davis, who recently lost his grandfather.

Hold the Line!- while Trent Williams’ holdout continues, the offensive line allowed one sack while generating a little over two yards per carry.  The combination of Erick Flowers and Donald Penn were also whistled for a combined four penalties in the fourth quarter.  Move along, nothing to see here.

Third and a tale of two halves- the team converted 5 of 9 before intermission, and went 0 for 4 during the Eagles’ comeback.  The team ran on 12 of 13 plays, the other being a direct snap to Chris Thompson that was snuffed out.  Keenum completed 8 of 12 passes with 5 conversions, with the top targets being Vernon Davis (one conversion on three catches on five attempts) and Paul Richardson (two conversions on two attempts).  Yardage breakdown:  2 for 3 on short (1-3 needed) yardage, 1 for 3 on medium, and 2 for 7 on long yardage (7+ yards needed).

Defensive Deficiencies- things began well enough, before the second half saw the Eagles score the first four times they had the football.  The D generated just one sack, while Philly held the ball for over 21 minutes after intermission.  Quinton Dunbar led the team with nine tackles; and I maintain that it’s never good for a cornerback to pace the team in stops.

Special Teams Glass Mostly Full- Dustin Hopkins converted both field goal attempts and went 2-2 in extra points while Tress Way averaged 54 yards per punt.  Trey Quinn returned a punt for 11 yards while Steven Sims averaged 15 yards per kickoff return.  Punt coverage did allow 11.5 yards per return and the Eagles didn’t have a kickoff return.

Flying Flags- the Redskins were whistled 12 times for 96 yards.  Eight on offense, one on defense and three on special teams.  A league-high four holds (plus one more on special teams) and two false starts were the repeat offenses.  Erick Flowers (two holds) and Donald Penn (a chop block and a false start) are the early leaders in the race nobody wants to win.  The worst penalty?

Dissecting the Division-  Dallas’ 35-17 win gives the Cowboys first place after one week, while the Eagles are in second for the moment.  The Skins’ minus-five point differential means they’re in third and avoid the cellar for the moment.

West is Best- I know it’s early, but the NFC West went 3-0-1 while the AFC West is 3-1 after one week.

 

Sometimes an NFL season can turn on a dime.  In the span of four days last week, the Redskins lost their starting quarterback for the season and fell out of sole possession of first place of the NFC East.  Instead of 8-3 with a three game lead in the division, the Burgundy and Gold are fighting for their playoff lives with a backup quarterback that hasn’t seen regular action in four years.  The 23-21 loss to Houston and 31-23 defeat at Dallas don’t have this team on the ropes, but they’re not in great shape for 2018–or beyond.

Broken Leg, Busted Dreams- the season-ending injury of Alex Smith came on the 33rd anniversary of Joe Theismann’s career-ending compound fracture against the New York Giants.  Before the injury, Smith had thrown interceptions on back to back first half possessions.  He also had his lowest completion percentage and yards per attempt of the season and was sacked three times for the third straight week.  Now the veteran stares into the face of an 8 to 10 month rehabilitation.  Will he be able to come back after this?  And if not, how does this team handle the salary cap albatross?

Colt at the Controls- while McCoy threw a touchdown pass on his first drive off the bench, he tossed three interceptions against the Cowboys.  The new starter has a 73.9 passer rating, but now has a full week of practice reps with the first string for the first time since 2014.  So there’s that.  And didn’t he have his best moment in a Monday night on the road that year?

Third and New- under McCoy, the Skins converted 5 of 15 third downs.  The lone running play saw Adrian Peterson gain four yards on third and one.  Colt completed 3 of 9 passes with each of his completions resulting in a conversion while getting sacked twice and scrambling twice (moving the chains once).  His top target:  Jordan Reed (two catches/conversions in four passes thrown to).

Flying Flags- six penalties for 43 yards against Houston and four infractions for 25 yards at Dallas, giving the team 64 penalties (14th most in the league) for 692 yards (5th highest).  Four on offense (three false starts and a hold), five on defense (three holds, an illegal use of the hands, and a roughing the passer) and a hold on special teams.  For the season, offensive holding (23) and false starts (17) are the biggest offenders.  Morgan Moses has the most accepted penalties (8) while Fabian Moreau (6) is gaining ground; the safety’s hold in the fourth quarter against Dallas allowed the Cowboys to hold the ball for three more minutes and help kill the clock.

Dissecting the Division- the loss drops the Skins to second place in the NFC East, as Dallas owns the division record tiebreaker.  While the Cowboys own the fourth seed in the NFC, the Redskins are sixth-taking the second wildcard thanks to a conference  record tiebreaker against Seattle and a head-to-head tiebreaker against Carolina.  Philadelphia’s rally past the New York Giants keeps the Eagles’ season from hitting the skids…the third place team is ninth overall in the conference.  The New York Giants had a chance to escape the cellar but instead stay in the basement and are 14th in the NFC.

If the playoffs began today- the NFC matchups would have the Redskins visiting Chicago and Dallas hosting Minnesota; with top seed New Orleans playing the Cowboys, Vikings or Skins and the Los Angeles Rams meeting the Bears, Dallas or the Vikes.  The AFC would have Pittsburgh hosting the Los Angeles Chargers and Baltimore at Houston, with top seed Kansas City drawing the Steelers, Chargers or Ravens and New England preparing for the Texans, Pittsburgh or LA.

Competing Quartets, and the Conference Contest- the NFC East is 20-24…tied for sixth best (or worst, depending on your perspective) with the AFC East and NFC West.  The NFC South and AFC West are the tied for first at 24-20.  The AFC currently owns a 24-23 edge over the NFC.

 

 

 

Remember last year when the Redskins went to Seattle with an offensive line held together by duct tape and paper clips, only to bring back a victory from Puget Sound?  Well this past weekend the Burgundy and Gold used rubber bands and masking tape to keep the line semi-solid in a 16-3 win by Tampa Bay.  Instead of losing a second straight game to a fellow future wildcard contender, the Skins are two games clear of a muddled NFC East and are off to their best start in ten years (we won’t mention who was coaching the Maroon and Black that autumn).  This has the feel of 2012 and 2015 all over again:  a first-year starting quarterback at Fed Ex Field exceeding expectations amidst a division ripe for the taking.  Enjoy the ascent, because if there’s anything we’ve learned from 2012 and 2015 it’s that 2013 and 2016 are distinct possibilities.

Turnovers Told the Tale- four takeaways helped keep the Buccaneers out of the end zone.  Josh  Norman’s interception at the goal line on the first drive of the day set the tone.  Greg Stroman’s interception led to the team’s final points of the afternoon.  Ha Ha Clinton-Dix’s fumble recovery in the end zone ended another Bucs drive into the red zone.  And Ryan Kerrigan’s fumble recovery inside the ten ended Tampa Bays’ last best chance to rally.  And the Skins did not turn the ball over at all.  The team now ranks third in the league at +11 in turnover margin, and they needed every one Sunday to prevail.

Mr. Smith Goes to Consistency- for the third time in four weeks Alex Smith threw for exactly 178 yards.  The Skins won all three of those games…and are 5-0 when he throws for under 250 yards (1-3 when he crosses the 21st century marker for “productive passer”).  If he throws for exactly 178 yards against Houston, we’ll know the fix is in.

Cousins Comparison- Kirk and company had a bye this past week, but I took my bye last week (writing back-to-back-to-back-to-back-to-back college basketball previews for WTOP.COM) so let’s revisit how the former Franchise Tagged one fared:  18-22 passing for 164 yards and a touchdown with an interception in the Vikings’ 24-9 win over Detroit.  Minnesota is 5-3-1 and in second place of the NFC North, currently owning the second wildcard.  Cousins for the season owns a passer rating of 102.2 (9th best in the league) while Alex Smith is at 90.7 after nine games (21st in the NFL).

Peterson Provides Production- he didn’t gain 100 yards, but the Skins main threat on the ground rushed for 68 yards–including two first down scampers in third and short situations.  His 672 yards through nine games is already more than his numbers from the last two years (and three teams) combined over 13 games played.

Catching On- Maurice Harris led the team with 5 catches for 52 yards, following up his 10 reception effort against Atlanta.  With 26 catches this fall, the third-year pro has already more than doubled his career numbers.  Not bad for a fringe roster player.

Third and Two Halves- the Skins went 0-for-4 on the money down in the first half and 5-for-9 after intermission.  Alex Smith completed 5-of-8 passes while getting sacked once, moving the chains twice.  The running game moved the marker on 3-of-4 plays (Peterson twice and Kapri Bibbs once).  Smith’s top target?  Maurice Harris and Josh Doctson each notched a pair of catches on two targets–each moving the chains once (Doctson’s grab was for a touchdown).  Yardage breakdown:  2-for-2 on short-yardage, 1-for-5 on intermediate (4 to 6 yards needed) and 2-for-6 on long-yardage.  Almost 50% of the third downs needed seven or more yards-less than ideal.

D gets a pass- so they gave up 501 yards…but when it mattered they stopped the Buccaneers shy of the end zone each time.  Mason Foster led the way with 10 tackles while Preston Smith and Matt Ioannidis notched sacks.  Plenty to be happy with, but also plenty to work on moving forward.

Extra Special Teams- Dustin Hopkins nailed his three field goal attempts (unlike his Tampa Bay counterpart Chandler Catanzaro who missed two of three and was cut) with a long of 43 yards.  Tress Way averaged 49.4 yards per punt, but that merely graces the surface.  Four of his five landed inside the Bucs’ 20 with Way’s three second-half kicks landing at the four-, six- and 13-yard line.

Flying Flags- eight infractions for 52 yards gives the team 64 for 624 yards (9th and 4th most in the NFL). Of the five on the offense, two were false starts while the other three were holds (the Skins 21 holds this year are the most in the league).  Morgan Moses had one of each while recent pickup Jonathan Cooper had a pair of holds.  The two defensive penalties (neutral zone infraction and a hold) came in the fourth quarter and were luckily wiped out by Ryan Fitzpatrick’s third turnover of the day.  The special teams’ flag was an illegal formation on a kickoff.  Costliest penalty?  Those two that kept the Bucs’ late drive alive.

Dissecting the Division- the Skins own a two-game lead in the NFC East and due to conference record would be the fourth seed “if the playoffs began today”, which they obviously do not.  Dallas (4-5) owns the head-to-head tiebreaker with Philadelphia thanks to Sunday night’s win and is in 10th place of the conference–the Eagles holding down 11th.  The New York Giants may be in last place of the division but depart the conference basement with their Monday night victory in San Francisco.

NFC East no Longer Least- despite the worst winning percentage (.444) of the league’s eight quartets, the Skins’ division after a 3-1 week at least moves into lock-step with the NFC West (17-21) and AFC East (18-22).  The NFC South (21-15) continues to be the best bunch, even with a 1-3 week that saw Tampa Bay squander 501 yards of offense, Atlanta lose to Cleveland and Carolina get crushed by Pittsburgh.  The Interconference Contest (that means absolutely nothing) is also tied at 22 wins apiece.

 

Sunday’s 20-13 win at the New York Giants had “trap game” written all over it in such a manner it was almost disgusting.  If Hollywood cast for “Letdown Games”, this would be the prime candidate.  But instead of a disappointing defeat to cut whatever momentum the Redskins had built, coach Jay Gruden’s team comes home off to their hottest start since 2008 (we won’t go over how that ended, but it involved the Skins wearing burgundy on burgundy in a prime time game).  For a franchise that has missed the postseason in eight of the last ten years, there are no small victories.  Especially in the division.  Especially on the road.

Mr. Smith goes to the Meadowlands- Alex completed 20 of 32 passes for 178 yards and a touchdown while running for 13 yards on three carries and avoiding a sack.  While he’s not winning the Skins games at this time, Smith isn’t losing them.

Country Cousins- Kirk threw for 359 yards and two touchdowns, but also tossed an interception that was run back for a New Orleans touchdown.  While Cousins’ passer rating is over ten points (102.5 to 91.3) higher than Smith’s he also has four interceptions plus four lost fumbles this fall to just a pair of turnovers for Smith.

Yo Adrian- Mr. Peterson rumbled for a season-high 149 yards and a 64-yard touchdown while catching a TD pass that put the Skins on the board.  The offseason pickup is on pace to rush for 1,300 yards- not bad for a 33-year old.

Top Targets- Jordan Reed had arguably his best day of the season, catching seven passes for 38 yards.  Josh Doctson added season highs of five grabs and 49 yards.  While Paul Richardson and Chris Thompson are less than 100% and Jamison Crowder is on the shelf, Doctson’s presence is all the more important.

Third and Just Enough- the offense moved the chains on 6-of-15 attempts…with Alex Smith completing 8-of-12 passes for five conversions.  He also had a scramble for three yards on 3rd & 13.  Jordan Reed was the top target- catching four of seven passes thrown his way for two conversions.  The two runs?  Adrian Peterson gained one yard on 3rd & 1 while Christ Thompson gained a yard on 3rd & 10 in the fourth quarter.   Distance breakdown:  3-for-4 on 3rd & short (1-3 yards needed), 2-for-5 on 3rd and medium (4-6) and 1-for-6 on 3rd & long (7+ yards needed).

D continues to Grade Well- the Skins held the Giants to 37 yards on 14 carries while handcuffing NY to 2-of-14 on third down.  Matt Ioannidis tallied 2.5 of the team’s seven sacks while Mason Foster led the way with 13 tackles.  D.J. Swearinger posted a pair of interceptions to give the safety a league-best four picks on the season.

Special Situations- Tress Way averaged 49.2 yards per punt.  Wow.  Dustin Hopkins made two of three field goal attempts-missing a 41-yarder-while connecting on both extra point tries.  While the punt coverage team allowed a 19-yard return, there were minimal failures.

Flying Flags-  eight penalties for 90 yards–with 46 of coming on a defensive pass interference on Montae Nicholson that set up a Giants field goal (and that was the only flag on the D).  Four penalties were on offense (two false starts, a hold and a PI) while to were on special teams (false start on an extra point and offsides on a free kick).  Seven weeks into the season, over 50% have been either holds (13) or false starts (12).  Sunday’s most costly penalty?  A false start on Morgan Moses turned a 3rd & 1 into a 3rd & 6–resulting in a field goal.

Dissecting the Division- the Skins at 5-2 keep their one and a half game lead over Philadelphia, who beat Jacksonville in London Sunday morning.  There’s heaven, hell, purgatory and 9:30am London games.  Idle Dallas drops two games off the pace at 3-4 and responds by firing their offensive line coach.  The New York Giants at 1-7 continue to make the case for not being as good as their record would lead you to believe.  NFC seed/place:  Redskins are 3rd, Philly is 9th, the Cowboys are 12th and the Giants are 16th.

NFC Least- the division still has the worst composite record at 13-17, one half game behind the AFC South (14-17).  Good news for the Skins who still play Houston, Jacksonville and Tennessee.  The best quartet?  The NFC South is 17-11–bad news for the Burgundy and Gold who still have to play Atlanta and Tampa Bay.