Archives for posts with tag: Miracle
This year we lost a lot of “friends in the field”, from John McNamara at the Annapolis Capital Gazette to Rich Tandler at NBC Sports Washington.  From former WTOP anchor Sean Hall to Indiana basketball beat reporter Terry Hutchens.  I’ll miss each one.  Also passing this past year was Chris Chase, the writer of USA Today’s “For the Win”.  Chris and I connected on our affection for sports movies, good and bad.  Our last conversation concerned his list of top ten sports movies.  Here’s the list I contributed…and one raises the question, are these the best films ever made?  No.  But each is interesting in their own way.  Just like the friends I lost this past year.
Rocky III- from Thunder Lips to the amazingly quotable Clubber Lang, this has it all.  And Apollo shows he was the true soul of the series.  Sadly, I’ll never run on the beach the same way again.
 
Damn Yankees- this past year I swore Nats rookie Juan Soto was the second coming of Joe Hardy.  Gwen Virdon in petal-pushers easily boasts a WAR of 10+.  And the teacher from Fast Times at Ridgemont High is the devil. Makes perfect sense.
 
Victory- combining soccer, Stallone and a World War II prison camp escape.  Pele elevates the soccer sequences with the patented bicycle kick…and speaks the pivotal line of the film.  It’s in the net…
 
North Dallas Forty- from watching Nick Nolte drag himself out of bed to the “these aren’t the Cowboys” casting of coach and quarterback, a spot-on look at the NFL of the 70’s.  Favorite quote, from a team executive looking to show Nolte he’s obsolete: “Do you speak Canadian?”
 
Big Wednesday- coming of age surfing film in the 70’s trailing three friends through the Vietnam era. Great camera work, plus Gary Busey’s character was nicknamed “The Masochist”.  And he delivers.
 
The Naked Gun-  Enrico Polazzo ruined me for being serious during the National Anthem for 3-5 years.  And what team in their right mind bats Jay Johnstone leadoff?  Word is Reggie Jackson improvised his “robot” mannerisms for his big scene (“I must kill…the Queen”).
 
Teen Wolf-  We all knew Jimmy Chitwood would hit the shot, but could Scott when he wasn’t the wolf?  And how did NIKE not get in on sponsoring the Beavers or the Dragons?  “Win—in the End!” is a great song too.
 
Karate Kid- if Daniel is so bummed about leaving New York, why is he wearing a Wes Chandler jersey?  Front-runner.  And there are theorists on YouTube who say that Daniel was the real villain.  Worth a watch or 20.
 
Miracle- “THIS IS YOUR TIME!” works on me every time.  I invite you to check out the quickie TV movie made in the early 80’s with a 70-something Karl Malden playing a 40-something Herb Brooks, Steve Guttenberg as Jim Craig and Marsha Brady’s husband from the “Brady Brides” as an Olympic hopeful.
 
Eight Men Out- the good guys don’t always win.  And there they double-cross the game as well as themselves.  Fantastic performances by a who’s-who of “that’s the guy from…”
 
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PORTIONS PREVIOUSLY APPEARING ON WTOP.COM–

How well do we really know each other?  How many of our secrets to we share with those who we consider close friends, neighbors and co-workers?  How much of each of us is an iceberg to others–and what steps do we take to make sure the 90% stays underwater?

It’s easy to be all-in on FX’s “The Americans”.  The spy show takes place in Washington, D.C. during the Reagan administration and unlike the movie “No Way Out” did not have anyone boarding the Metro in Georgetown.  There was plenty of violence and sex…with plenty of 80’s cultural references in the mix (David Copperfield really DID make the Statue of Liberty disappear!).  Over six seasons the show was equal parts up-tempo and slow-burn…led by Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys (two actors that wound up getting married during the series run) as a pair of travel agents who might just be working for the KGB (okay, SPOILER ALERT, they are).  The seemingly normal couple with two kids and a nice house in Falls Church (I swear a buddy of mine used to mow lawns in that neighborhood) were doing their darnedest to undermine the good old United States of America.  And this was no “Boris & Natasha”–they were chillingly effective at what they did (the suitcase from season three).  But the show became just as much about an evolving marriage as it was about the two spies in it.

Deception lurked around every corner for six strong seasons– from the semi-convincing wigs to having a teenage daughter swipe pages of her minister’s diary.  In the midst of all of the deception, targets (poor Martha) and multiple handlers (Frank Langella as Gabriel remains my favorite), the characters of Philip and Elizabeth (or Mischa and Nadezhda in their home country) went from spies pretending to be married to a married couple pretending to not be spies.  A parent always wants a better world for their children, and after they brought Paige into their world of spycraft one saw both parents push back from condemning their daughter to their world of deception.  Elizabeth wanted a safe job as a State Department mole while Philip wanted Paige to be completely out of the family business (I know what you’re thinking as we head to the finale:  poor Henry Jennings was going to be captain of his prep school hockey team as a senior–as they say in the mother country, Не больше).

And as fate would have it (aren’t TV coincidences crazy?!?), “The Americans” added the wrinkle of having an FBI Agent move next door.  Unlike most sit-coms where the wacky neighbor provides welcome comic relief, Noah Emmerich as Stan Beeman was akin to having missiles in Cuba (or Turkey, depending on whose perspective you prefer)-danger on the doorstep.  Naturally, Stan and Philip became best friends.  And while we saw Philip evolve in his marriage and work we saw Stan’s marriage crumble (due to deception) and work go sideways to a point where he left counter-intelligence.  But in the final episodes, he can’t stop thinking that the Jennings might not be all what they seem.  And what has made the show work is you want to root for Stan and his FBI co-workers to win (it doesn’t hurt that Emmerich played assistant coach Craig Patrick in the movie “Miracle”)…while still be caught up in rooting for Philip and Elizabeth in some way (but not too much).

What also helped “The Americans” maintain a high standard was the devotion to the process of spying:  more than simply car chases and gadgets, the nuts and bolts of espionage was handled deftly from day one.  Philip, Elizabeth, Stan and everyone in the spy game were dogged grinders with not every play paying off.  The show also boasted quite an assembly-line of quality actors in minor roles and bit-parts, from Costa Ronin’s Oleg to Dylan Baker’s turn as a bio-chemist in Season 4.  The show was rich in characters, capers and possibilities.  The biggest one facing fans now is whether Stan’s new wife Renee is KGB, CIA or simply a red herring? In the true spirit of the show, I have a feeling we will never know.

The final run of episodes take place in 1987, during the INF Treaty talks.  Elizabeth has turned against her handler who is trying to overthrow Gorbachev and ruin the summit. Philip is on the run after being spotted with a Russian Orthodox Priest in DC (which amazingly looks like Brooklyn).  Stan is getting closer.  And everybody’s favorite machine, the Mail Robot, continues to hum efficiently.