Archives for posts with tag: Michael A Taylor

Add Juan Soto to the growing Nats’ Injured List.  And Matt Adams.  And–potentially Michael A. Taylor.  And–for a few hours–the flight from Philadelphia to Milwaukee–the team’s charter plane.  Not to mention their pitching coach:  sayonara Doug Lilliquist, welcome Paul Menhart.  The Nats aren’t just minus their opening day #2 through #5 hitters, but they’re also without their best bat off the bench (who had been forced into a starting role) and potentially their best defensive outfielder (we await the moment when Taylor is put on the IL).  Not helpful in the early season when one has yet to find itself.  The team that had issues getting away from .500 (nine times in April) is now taking serious water (losses in 11 of their last 16 games).  And their gauntlet of playoff teams from last year continues with trips to Milwaukee and the Los Angeles Dodgers.

About that Delay- during a season where the team was expecte to contend yet is five games under .500 in early May, it’s only fitting that the team flight had trouble taking off as well Sunday.  The Nats boarded their team charter at 6:30 p.m. but mechanical issues kept them on the tarmac for eight hours. They finally deplaned at 3 a.m. (wondering when the peanuts ran out) and went back to their hotel before flying later in the morning.  On a trip where there are no off-days, this was beyond not ideal.  Fire up the espresso machine in the visitor’s clubhouse.

Dissecting the Division- the Phillies move a game and a half ahead of the pack at 19-14 while the Braves and Mets stand between the Phils and Nats.  Atlanta appears to be in better shape for the long haul, as the Mets’ -23 run differential ranks 12th in the National League.  Miami remains the floor that nobody can possibly touch.

Bryce’s Bat- the former face of the Nats is hitting .233 with six homers and 21 RBI, and that’s while batting .321/2/7 against his former team. Harper’s 43 strikeouts are tied for the fifth most in the majors and he’s getting booed semi-regularly.

O’s Woes- the Birds come home ten games under .500 to a series with the suddenly-hot Boston Red Sox who are finally playing like the defending world champs that they are (12 wins in 17 games).  For the record, this year’s team is four games ahead of last year’s pace at this point–and they’re a step ahead in the rebuilding process.

Last Week’s Heroes- Kurt Suzuki hit .462 with three homers and five RBI while Howie Kendrick hit .348. Sean Doolittle notched a pair saves while tossing 2.1 scoreless innings and Kyle Barraclough threw three scoreless frames over three appearances.  Stephen Strasburg reached the 1,500 strikeout milestone by whiffing nine over 6.2 innings in a sweep-averting victory against St. Louis.

Last Week’s Humbled- Joe Ross allowed seven earned runs over 0.2 innings (94.50 ERA for those without calculators) while Matt Grace posted a 10.38 ERA.  Carter Kieboom suddenly looked like a rookie while hitting 2-for-23 while Michael A. Taylor went 0-12 with five strikeouts before injuring his wrist.

Game to Watch- the Nats are 1-10 in series openers and are also 1-6 in games where Max Scherzer pitches.  They’ve also plated just 10 runs in his last four starts.  Monday the Nats meet Milwaukee after getting uneven rest while also dealing with a ton of injuries. Let’s just say I’m curious to see how they react.

Game to Miss- they wrap up their roadtrip and series in Los Angeles Sunday.  Boys and girls of all ages, let’s take the day off from the Nats Rollercoaster and celebrate mothers everywhere.  Happy Mother’s Day.

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After a winter of wondering, the Harper has landed.  Free agent Bryce Harper agres to a 13-year contract with Philadelphia worth a record-$330 million.  Instead of an amicable split where the one-time face of the franchise heads west to play for San Francisco or the Los Angeles Dodgers, the Nats poster boy is headed to the team’s NL East neighbor to the north.  Instead of dealing with thoughts of what could have been for one or two series a summer, Nationals fans get to face Harper 19 times over the next decade-plus.  He’ll be wearing a different shade of red…with a curly P on his cap.  Phreaking Phantastic.

It’s never ideal to lose a six-time All Star and former league MVP, but the Nationals have constructed their club in a manner to minimize Harper’s departure.  The emergence of Juan Soto last year provided unexpected depth-and the 20-year old will be the team’s leftfielder of the present and future.  Taking over in right will be veteran Adam Eaton, now two years removed from a knee injury that hijacked his 2017 season.  Prime prospect Victor Robles is the future in centerfield, with Michael A. Taylor being able to provide defensive depth at all three positions.

While the absence of Harper in the lineup is not ideal, not having him on the payroll will benefit the long-term sculpting of the roster under General Manager Mike Rizzo.  Anthony Rendon is due to become a free agent next year, and all things being equal an offensive third baseman with sharp defensive skills is much harder to find and develop than an outfielder.  Moving forward, having Rendon on this team for the remainder of their playoff-contending window is more important than having Harper on this team in 2026.

The Phillies get the free agent boost they were looking for this offseason;  last year’s team won 80 games but faded down the stretch.  They also ranked 22nd in the majors in runs scored.  Harper will bat third in a revamped lineup along with offseason acquisitions J.T. Realmuto and Andrew McCutchen. After a few years of building and retooling, the Phillies are ready to win now.  Just like the Washington Nationals have been doing this decade.  The balance of  NL East power began to shift in 2011 when the Nats signed Jayson Werth away from the Phillies; after winning 102 games that year and losing in the NLDS the Phils have not posted a winning record–while the Nats posted a winning mark every year since going 80-81 in 2011.

Oh, and by the way…for those curious Bryce Harper and his new team come to Nationals Park for the first time this season April second.  Who’s ready for a reunion?

 

 

 

 

 

The Nationals wrapped up their long journey into nowhere Sunday in Colorado.  The 12-0 loss was the perfect whimper to a season that had shown plenty of promise and problems.  It was fitting that the team finished 82-80 during a season where we saw a ton of potential (a pythagorean record of 90-72) but fail to execute when it mattered (18-24 in one-run games and 4-10 in extra innings).  With the exception of the team’s dominant play in May, it was two steps forward and two steps  back.  Instead of seeing if they can get further in October…the Nats head into winter wondering if they have what it takes to get back to the playoffs.

Clutch Metrics- combining the one-run games record with the Nats extra-inning results is an interesting exercise:  their 22-24 mark is the worst in the NL East–10.5 games behind Atlanta’s 29-20 record in such games.  They finished eight games out.  I know, some extra-inning games are one run affairs, but an extra inning victory or loss should count double towards the “clutch factor”.

Last Week’s Heroes- stars past, present and future reigned as Bryce Harper hit .348 in what could be his final week as a Washington National.  Anthony Rendon actually finished with a higher WAR this year and hit .348 with 2 homers and 9 RBI.  The future is bright with prime prospect Victor Robles batting .467 with a homer and 5 RBI…and Juan Soto hitting a pair of HR while driving in five en route to six and 20 in September (and Rookie of the Month honors).  Max Scherzer struck out 10 in his final start of the season, finishing with 300 on the season.

Last Week’s Humbled- Austen Williams, Tim Collins and Jefry Rodriguez each had ERA’s in the double digits, but Sammy Solis wrapped up a rough 2018 with an infinity week- no outs recorded and a home run surrendered in his only outing.  The first base tandem of Ryan Zimmerman and Matt Reynolds combined to hit 3-for-21.  Wilmer Difo hit .143 to wrap up a .191 September.  Upon further review- Difo had the fifth most at-bats on the Nats this year.  That is just one reason why the Nats are home in October.

Who could be Gone:  Bryce Harper isn’t the only National with an expiring contract.  Matt Wieters, Greg Holland, Kelvin Herrera, Jeremy Hellickson and Joaquin Benoit all come off the books this winter.  One would think that Wieters might be the only one to come back out of that pack.  The crowded outfield of Robles, Soto and a presumably healthy Adam Eaton could give cause for the trading of Michael A. Taylor-especially if Harper re-signs.

 

Opening Day Lineup for 2019?  If Bryce Harper departs…

RF- Adam Eaton- hopefully Mighty Mouse will be healthy…as he was limited to 95 games this year and even when he played seem a gear or two shy of what he showed in April 2017.

SS- Trea Turner- one needs his speed close to the top of the order…although I’m tempted to put Victor Robles in this spot.

3B- Anthony Rendon- the best overall hitter in this lineup the last two seasons…this is where you put that guy.

LF- Juan Soto- the 19-year old performed beyond expectations…can he duplicate a season for the ages?  Or at least avoid a sophomore slump?

1B- Ryan Zimmerman with Mark Reynolds- Zim when healthy is still a dangerous player–but the veteran’s been limited to fewer than 120 games in four of the last five seasons.

CF- Victor Robles with Michael A. Taylor- if Soto’s 116 games is a small sample size, then what to make of the prime prospect’s 59 at-bats?  And can Taylor’s bat (.176 after the All Star Break) catch up to his glove?

C- Matt Wieters…and Spencer Kieboom?- is this the duo the Nats want, the tandem they need or the combination they’ll have to settle for?  And if Wieters walks, who comes to DC?

2B- Wilmer Difo/Adrian Sanchez/Howie Kendrick- can the veteran come back from his torn Achilles?  If so, he switches spots with Robles.  If not, this position bats eighth and tries to outhit Max Scherzer.

It’s hot in DC. For those unfamiliar, Washington has a different calendar.  Instead of May it’s called “Monsoon”.  And instead of June it’s “Heatbomb”.  Unfortunately as it’s gotten hot in Washington the Nationals’ bats have cooled off.  The team ranks 26th in MLB in batting average and runs scored this month.  In a game of inches a team’s fortunes can turn on a dime…and since June began the 5-8 Nats resemble their April counterparts more than their May selves.  And with a rotation minus Stephen Strasburg and Jeremy Hellickson for the time being, the Nats can ill afford getting shut out on consecutive Max Scherzer starts.  Meanwhile, Atlanta and Philadelphia are turning on the heat. 

Dissecting the Division- Atlanta leads by three and a half games….and 70 games into the season it’s obvious the Braves are no fluke with the fifth best run differential in the majors.  Philadelphia moved within four games of the lead by taking two of three from NL Central-leading Milwaukee;  their next four series come against winning ballclubs.  While the New York Mets ended their free-fall by splitting a series with Arizona they’re well on the road to non-contention.  Miami?  Five wins in seven games have the Marlins all of a sudden in contention for fourth place.  Will Derek Jeter hang a celebratory banner?

O’s Woes- the Birds avoided a double-digit losing streak by beating Miami 10-4 Sunday.  The Father’s Day victory was kind of fitting because the O’s last home win came on Mother’s Day (for further reference “Grandparents Day” is September 9th-and the Orioles are on the road that day).  The 20-50 start is one game better than the 1988 Gold Standard- and now Buck Showalter’s team needs to play .467 ball (43-49) the rest of the way to avoid a triple-digit loss campaign.

Last Week’s Heroes- Michael A. Taylor hit .600 while Adam Eaton in his first full week off of the Disabled List batted .333.  Rookie Juan Soto simply led the team in runs scored and RBI.  Max Scherzer struck out ten over six innings while Sean Doolittle notched a save.

Last Week’s Humbled- Tanner Roark, Gio Gonzalez and Eric Fedde each posted ERA’s over six. Daniel Murphy’s return from the DL was not as smooth as he hit 2-for-20.  Bryce Harper went 1-for-16. Is Ryan Zimmerman coming back soon?

Game to Watch- Thursday Max Scherzer starts the series finale with the Orioles at Nats Park. Unlike the last few years, there is no “potential World Series preview” chatter about this week’s interleague showdown. Max has been stung by two soft offensive outings in a row.  One thinks he’ll leave little to chance this week.

Game to Miss- Saturday the Nats face Philadelphia at 4:05, meaning the bulk of your day will be spent at the ballpark on what will probably be a day best enjoyed in the pool or on the Georgetown Waterfront.  Even without the happy hour pricing on weekends, the raw oysters are money (try the fried clam basket).  You’ll thank me later…

What a difference a couple of weeks make.  The Nationals have won 13 of 15 to turn from April underachievers to May movers and shakers…highlighted by a four game sweep of Arizona on the road.  Somehow despite missing major pieces in the lineup the Nats are within a stone’s throw of first place in a continuing to deflate NL East.  Credit a starting rotation that is the second stingiest (2.91 ERA) in the big leagues…and just enough offense (7th in MLB this month) to put W’s on the board and keep this club in contention until in theory the big bats on the DL return to the lineup.

More Aches- add Ryan Zimmerman and a hurting oblique to the growing list of lumber in the land of limbo.  Four of the top six bats in the order (Eaton, Rendon, Murphy and now Zim) have been sat down this spring- with Eaton now on the 60-day disabled list and Murphy past the point of “as long as he’s back by May 1st” concern.  In addition, Brian Goodwin’s stay on the DL nears one month means that the team has been forced to go with Plan C…and sometimes D and E in LF.

Dissecting the Division- Atlanta’s Monday matinée victory over the Chicago Cubs gave the Braves a game and a half lead in the NL East…as six wins in seven games keeps them ahead of the surging Phillies (four wins in five games) and Nationals.  The Braves’ bats (#1 in the MLB in average) and the Phillies’ rotation (2nd most quality starts in the majors) have those clubs ahead of the Nats (24-18) for the moment.  The Mets remain over .500, but just barely…

Break up the Birds- who are these people?  Back to back series wins for the Orioles have the team no longer saddled with the worst record in the majors.  Manny Machado is a major monster (.350, 13 HR & 38 RBI) while Jonathan Schoop is off the disabled list.  Unfortunately the nightmare season of Chris Tillman lands the former ace on the disabled list.  The 10.46 ERA this year may not be the largest sample size, but he’s 2-11 since the start of last year.

Last Week’s Heroes- Matt Reynolds homered twice in Sunday’s win over Arizona, while Trea Turner scored 8 runs and Matt Adams drove in 7 runs.  Stephen Strasburg went 2-0 while Max Scherzer struck out 11 and allowed zero walks in his lone start (a victory).  Jeremy Hellickson posted a 0.77 ERA over two starts.  Sean Doolittle saved three games while tossing three scoreless innings.

Last Week’s Humbled- Michael A. Taylor hit .148 with 12 strikeouts (and no walks).  The early-season injuries are making life miserable for the training staff.  Hope they can go fishing on their off day this week.

Game to Watch- Wednesday Max Scherzer takes his 7-1 mark to the mound against C.C. Sabathia and the New York Yankees.  The Pinstripes are a big-league best 28-12 with four players already at 10+ home runs.  Max leads the majors in strikeouts and is fourth in ERA.  Even with FBI agent Stan Beeman finally realizing his neighbors are more than just “travel” agents, The Americans takes second place.

Game to Miss- the Washington Capitals are on a collision course with destiny…one that will result in me wearing a red suit for one day when they capture the Stanley Cup.  They took the first two games of their Eastern Conference Final with Tampa Bay on the road (and we won’t mention they did the same thing in the 2003 First Round only to lose in six games)…and host the Lightning Tuesday evening.  I’ll be there for WTOP– and even though the Gio Gonzalez-Masahiro Tanaka duel is compelling, the chance to watch the Caps take a 3-0 lead > regular season baseball in May.

 

Despite taking two of three from the NL East-leading New York Mets, the Nats this week find themselves far from DC–and far from where they want to be in the standings.  After dropping two of three to the Los Angeles Dodgers in a duel of defending division champs that was also a showdown of sub-.500 squads, the Nats are right where they were last week.  Two games under the break-even mark isn’t ideal in April…and only becomes more of a concern the longer this team plays tag with fourth place in the division.  Three guys are hitting .300 or better on this team:  two are pitchers and the third is a guy sitting on the disabled list (Adam Eaton).  Actually AJ Cole has been designated for assignment so Max Scherzer is the only player on the active roster hitting better than even .275.  Not awesome.

Rendon’s Rendevous with the Destiny- Anthony Rendon was finally placed on the DL Sunday.  He’s suffered from an injured toe that has kept him on the shelf since Friday the 13th.  He can only be disabled for three days prior to Sunday, so the Nats bats–already having issues–were further hamstrung for over a week.  Somewhere between the player, trainer, manager and general manager something slipped through the cracks and the underperforming lineup had to play shorthanded against a division leader and defending division champ.  Not awesome.

Dissecting the Division- the Mets continue to lead the NL East at 14-6…but they’ve lost 4 of 6.  Philadelphia is the new hot team with 4 straight wins and a 14-7 mark.  They’re getting it done with pitching:  the Phillies’ rotation ranks 5th in quality starts and 4th in team ERA.  Atlanta (12-8) won series against both clubs last week…and the Braves boast a potent offense that owns the 3rd best batting average in the bigs.  Miami?  The Marlins are 5-16 and are even worse than their record would lead you to believe.  I was amused that Derek Jeter opted not to travel with the team to Yankee Stadium, and assume that he forfeited his salary for those three days.

O’s Woes- as bad as things might be for the Nats, they aren’t their neighbors north on I-95 who are going south in the direction of 67-95.  The Birds have combined ineffective offense (last in the majors in hitting and 23rd in runs scored) with porous pitching (26th in ERA and last in opponent’s batting average).  They’ve won just twice since taking three of four from the New York Yankees in a series that seems a year ago.  Enjoy summer, gang.

Last Week’s Heroes- Michael A. Taylor hit .316 with a homer while Ryan Zimmerman went yard twice and drove in six.  Max Scherzer prevailed in his mound matchup with Clayton Kershaw, striking out 9 over 6 innings in a Nats’ lone LA win…and Tanner Roark scattered 2 hits over 7 innings in his start.  Neither Brandon Kintzler (4 scoreless innings over 4 appearances) nor Sean Doolittle (2 saves) allowed a run in relief.

Last Week’s Humbled- AJ Cole and Ryan Madson both posted ERA’s of 20.25…and while Madson will be a part of the bullpen plan this year, Cole could be done as a National.  The 2010 fourth round pick went 5-8 in 26 career appearances (19 starts) while posting an ERA of 5.32 since making his big-league debut in 2015.  Howie Kendrick hit .154 with 1 walk and 9 strikeouts–not ideal when you’re batting second.  The catching duo of Matt Wieters and Pedro Severino combined to hit 4 for 22 with 8 strikeouts.  Not ideal if you’re hitting anywhere in the lineup.

Game to Watch- Wednesday afternoon Max Scherzer pitches against Jeff Samardzija in the series finale with the Giants.  Max is pretty much must-watch every time he goes to the mound, and Samardzija tossed 5 shutout innings in his 2018 debut against the Angels.  It’s also a 3:45 start so one can get this game out of the way before the Wizards take on Toronto (or heaven forbid, the Caps clash with Columbus in a Game 7).

Game to Miss- Tuesday night the Nats pitch Tanner Roark against the Giants’ Ty Blach…who has been just that this month with 3 losses in 4 outings and ERA over 5 in April.  Plus, if there’s a Game 7 I’m getting to bed early the night before.

 

 

PORTIONS PREVIOUSLY APPEARING ON WTOP.COM–

What was the commercial that said, “you never get a second chance to make a first impression?”  Adam Eaton may get that chance this April as the team’s major offseason acquisition from last winter tries to finish what he started in 2017.  Eaton’s arrival last year was almost as much about who the Nats gave up:  former first round picks Lucas Giolito and Dane Dunning plus prime prospect Reynaldo Lopez. For the record, Giolito and Lopez both went 3-3 last year for the White Sox while Dunning pitched with single-A Kannapolis and Winston-Salem (although let’s be honest:  doesn’t Dane Dunning sound like the name of a teen sleuth in Young Adult Fiction?).  Eaton simply had one incredible April (ranking third in the majors in runs scored) before going down with a torn ACL 23 games into the season.

It’s amazing to think that the Nationals still went on to win 97 games minus their leadoff hitter for the vast majority of the season (and don’t forget they were minus plan B leadoff man Trea Turner for 60+ games due to a broken wrist).  Make no mistake, there was a void atop the order minus the player who earned the nickname Mighty Mouse:  he posted a .388 on base percentage (which would have ranked 2nd in MLB) from the leadoff spot while the other Nats’ leadoff hitters combined to hit .259 and the team finished 19th in the majors in on base percentage from the #1 spot in the batting order.  Trea Turner, Brian Goodwin and Wilmer Difo each have skills and can shine in the lineup, but none of them were able to duplicate Eaton’s April.

Every good sequel is a little bit different from the original, and that’s the case for Eaton II: Left Field Boogaloo.  Michael A. Taylor’s emergence last season in centerfield means Eaton shifts over to left.  There are those who dissect the numbers and analytics, and there are those who rely on the “eye test” when judging defensive players.  Both camps regard Eaton as better served in left field.  Last year 12 players saw action in left (including Eaton for three games) and stabilizing a position that is traditionally expected to produce offensively will be key.  Especially with Daniel Murphy’s recovery from knee surgery keeping the second baseman on the shelf until mid-April.

So the guy who is no longer the new kid in town gets a second chance at a first season with his new team that he’s been with for over a year.  At least he’ll get a chance to run around in July’s DC heat for the first time.  Bring some extra Mighty Mouse t-shirts to change into mid-game, Adam.  And welcome back.