Archives for posts with tag: JMU

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This was supposed to be the season for Michigan.  Jim Harbaugh came to Ann Arbor in 2015 after the Wolverines had swung and missed with Rich Rodriguez and Brady Hoke. Unlike Bo Schembechler leading Michigan to a Rose Bowl in his first season on campus, this rebuild was going to take time.  And year five meant that every player in the program was one brought on campus by Harbaugh.  Not to mention that Urban Meyer’s no longer coaching at Ohio State.  The path to the playoff was there, and “was” may be the operative word.

Saturday’s 35-14 loss by the No. 11 Wolverines to No. 13 Wisconsin saw the Badgers take a 28-0 halftime lead and make Michigan look like Rutgers.  Saturday’s loss puts the 21 points allowed to Middle Tennessee and Army in a different context, and the turnover-prone offense (seven lost fumbles in three games) that can’t get out of its own way looks all the more suspect.  Michigan’s only dipped its toe into one tough schedule:  three of their four October games are against ranked foes (including a non-conference tilt with Notre Dame) and November includes Michigan State and Ohio State, two schools that have had plenty of success against the Wolverines this decade-even after Harbaugh’s heralded arrival.  Once again, it looks as though Michigan end the season having gone to as many Big Ten Championship Games as Rutgers and Maryland.

 

Alma Mater Update- the Orange and I have an interesting relationship this autumn.  Because the game was on the ACC Network, I missed their season-opening shutout of Liberty.  I was in the press box for their painful pounding by Maryland so I got to see that defeat up close.  The following week’s loss to Clemson (homecoming?!) was on ABC and I saw the tail-end of that mess after covering the Navy-East Carolina game.  So when I caught last Saturday’s contest with Western Michigan, I was pleased to see they were up 21-0 in the second quarter.  Enter the defense that will help opposing skill position players get drafted a round or two earlier.  The lead was trimmed to 38-33 when I had to run errands and I later learned the Orange wound up winning 52-33.  So after four weeks, when I am watching or listening SU has been outscored 120-37 while they’ve handled foes 65-17 when I haven’t been able to monitor the team.  I apologize for being a hex this fall.

 

No. 21 Virginia (4-0) is off to its best start since 2004, but they certainly kept the Scott Stadium crowd on the edge of their seats as they trailed Old Dominion 17-7 at the half.  But just like they won the second halves against Pitt and Florida State, the Cavaliers were not to be denied in their 28-17 triumph. Seasons are not made in September, but as we’ve seen across the country they can definitely be ruined and while there are more than a few tough tests ahead UVa’s season of possibilities continues.

Cavalier Congrats: the legend of Bryce Perkins grows with another night where he led the team in rushing and scored a touchdown through the air and on the ground.  The offense also enjoyed a turnover-free night.  Charles Snowden notched 15 tackles with two sacks to pace a defense that handcuffed the Monarchs after halftime (66 total yards on 36 second half plays).

Cavalier Concerns: the offense had issues sustaining drives all evening, converting just 1 of 11 third downs.  Blame a running game that gained just 87 yards on 27 carries after accounting for sacks.  Special teams were not that special, as the Cavs had a field goal attempt blocked while averaging 36 yards per punt.  UVa was also whistled seven times for 70 yards.

Next: Saturday at 3:30 p.m. against Notre Dame.

 

James Madison (3-1, No. 2 in FCS) was tested on the road at Chattanooga as the Moccasins put 14 points on the board in the first quarter.  But the Dukes defense dominated the rest of the way in a 37-14 rout.

Duke Do’s: Percy Agyei-Obese rushed for a season-high 114 yards while Ben DiNucci completed 19 of 25 passes for 264 yards.  Ethan Ratke connected on all three of his field goal attempts.

Duke Don’ts: a costly special teams fumble in the first quarter let Chattanooga pull even after trailing 14-0.  The pass rush generated just one sack.

Next:  Saturday at 2 p.m. against Elon.

 

Towson (3-1, 1-1 CAA) fell in overtime to Villanova (No. 18 in FCS) 52-45.  Although the Tigers will take a tumble down the rankings (they were 5th entering the game against the Wildcats), the conference race has just begun.

Tiger Triumphs: Tom Flacco passed for 304 yards while rushing for 110 more, but Yeedee Thaenrat proved to be the money man in the red zone with three rushing touchdowns.  Coby Tippett tallied 13 tackles to pace the defense.

Tiger Troubles:  the defense allowed 295 yards rushing while allowing the Wildcats to convert on 12 of 19 third downs. Third down was an issue for the Towson offense as well, as they moved the chains on 4 of 13 tries.

Next: Saturday at (gulp) Florida.

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Welcome back everyone, and prepare to enter what has been claimed to be the best regular season in sports (amazing how many one-loss Alabama and Clemson teams make the playoff in a world where “every week matters”).  This year there’s a twist though:  Clemson is ranked first and Alabama is second!  I know, I’ll wait for you to pick yourself off of the floor.  In the current College Football Playoff era, the Tigers and Crimson Tide have combined for nine of the 20 semifinal berths.  And there’s a very good chance they’ll be joined by the two other schools with multiple CFP berths (blue bloods Ohio State and Oklahoma) while the Pac-12 champ pounds sand once again.  But it all starts this weekend.  Yes, you heard me correctly.  Even though No. 8 Florida faced Miami in Orlando last Saturday, this is technically week one.  Fans of the Gators and Hurricanes got to see to underprepared teams combine for five turnovers, 23 penalties and convert a combined 4-for-24 on third down.  Heading into the showdown it was referred to as “Week Zero”, and I wholeheartedly agree.  Bring on the real season.

 

Alma Mater Update- the Orange begin the year ranked for the first time since 1997.  Yes, SU hasn’t been in the Preseason Top 25 since Donovan McNabb was wearing #5.  Naturally they’re opening the season at…Liberty.  I do have friends headed to Lynchburg for the game as the drive is manageable, and I’m wondering if they’re going to follow the trend and bring Spiked Seltzer to the tailgate.  I’m holding my breath.

 

Maryland vs. Howard, noon (Big Ten Network).

The Terps will start a different quarterback in their opener for the fourth straight season, as Virginia Tech transfer Josh Jackson gets the nod. While with the Hokies Jackson started Labor Day weekend wins over ranked foes West Virginia and Florida State.  And he never had a running threat like Anthony McFarland: the sophomore looks to continue the momentum of last November where he posted a pair of 200-yard rushing games.  The Bison counter with third-year starting quarterback Caylin Newton (yes, he’s Cam’s younger brother) and the offensive weapons that led the MEAC in scoring last fall, but they also bring a defense that allowed 34 points per game in 2018.  

Presto’s Pick: Terrapins Triumph, 45-20.

 

Navy vs. Holy Cross, 3:30 p.m (CBS Sports Network). 

The long road back from 3-10 begins with a game against a Patriot League foe. One that was picked to finish second in its conference and ended 2018 with four straight wins.  But the Crusaders lost quarterback Geoff Wade to graduation, and Emmett Clifford (under 10 yards per completion and a 1-3 touchdown to interception ratio) is just the kind of QB the new-look Navy defense wants to confuse pre-snap.  All eyes will be on the arm of Midshipman quarterback Malcolm Perry as the team has been talking all month about throwing the ball more.  It’s one thing to say you’re going to open up the offense, it’s another thing entirely to try to do so in game situations and yet another thing to execute.

Presto’s Pick: Midshipmen crush the Crusaders, 38-14.

 

Virginia Tech at Boston College, 4 p.m (ACC Network).  

Of the three schools that marked the first exodus of the Big East to the ACC in 2004-05, the Hokies have been the most successful (Miami didn’t even win a Coastal Division title until last year) but for a while BC held its own against the Clemsons and Florida States in the Atlantic Division.  But since finishing first or second in the Atlantic each of their first five years in the league, the Eagles haven’t posted a winning ACC record.  Junior running back AJ Dillon rushed for 96 yards and a touchdown against the Hokies last year.  We’ll see how revamped Virginia Tech’s defense is this year after finishing near the bottom of the conference in 2018.  The road team has won four of the last five games in this series.

Presto’s Pick: Hokies make it happen, 27-17.

 

Virginia at Pitt, 7:30 p.m. (ACC Network).

Could this be the Cavaliers’ year?  The other six Coastal Division schools have each taken turns advancing to the Conference Championship Game since 2013.  Last year’s representative was a Pitt team that reached Charlotte behind 1,000-yard rushers Qadree Ollison and Darrin Hall; both are trying to stick with NFL rosters this summer.  The Panthers also have four new starters on their offensive line and a quarterback in junior Kenny Pickett who has plenty of experience but also a very low ceiling.   Cavaliers QB Bryce Perkins is coming off of a spectacular season where he was one of two FBS players to pass for at least 2,600 yards while rushing for 900+.  The other? Heisman Trophy winner Kyler Murray.

My UVa tailgating pals Kippy & Buffy are back for another exciting season, and just like their team that’s dreaming big in 2019 my favorite couple begins big: a bottle of 2013 Joseph Phelps Insignia. “Focused and fresh, this exceptionally concentrated wine showcases elegant tannin structure and a silky mouthfeel layered with dark fruit, sweet vanilla bean, cracked black pepper and bittersweet chocolate.”  Nothing bittersweet about the season ahead.

Presto’s Pick: Cavaliers are focused, fresh, and find a way to win, 27-20.

 

Georgetown falls at Davidson, Towson tops The Citadel, James Madison makes FCS proud with an upset win at West Virginia, William & Mary wins at Lafayette.

Last Year: 69-44, including a 1-8 week where I should have pulled a George Costanza and went the opposite.

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For college football fans in the D.C. metro area, this has been one rough decade. Maryland has had multiple reboots since firing the ACC Coach of the Year, while Virginia Tech saw the sad decline from perennial Coastal Division contender to a team that needed to schedule a bonus game against Marshall in order to keep its bowl streak alive. Virginia hasn’t beaten the Hokies since “Friends” was still on the air. Even Navy wasn’t immune last fall, with a 3-10 season that included a third straight loss to Army.

Thank goodness for the FCS. Area programs annually contend for conference crowns, deliver trips to the Football Final Four, and occasionally play for or even bring home a National Championship. Once again this fall there’s plenty of anticipation involving schools in the CAA, MEAC, and Patriot League — especially when one factors in the head coaching carousel that fired up this past offseason.

 

James Madison (9-4, 6-2 CAA, FCS Second Round) is the CAA Preseason favorite and begins the fall ranked second nationally in both FCS Polls.  The Dukes lost Head Coach Mike Houston to East Carolina, but for the second time in three years hires a proven replacement from the FCS ranks.  Curt Cignetti led Elon to the tournament in both of his seasons with the school, and last fall the Phoenix beat JMU in Harrisonburg.  He comes to a program that’s loaded:  19 of 22 starters return, and of those 19 starters 12 were All-CAA last season.  Quarterback Ben DiNucci returns for his second season as a starter, and he’ll have his top two targets back in wide receivers Riley Stapleton and Kyndel Dean.  Cignetti will have to revamp a running game that lost its top three ground gainers to graduation.

But just like last season, this year’s Dukes will once again begin with D: four of the returning 10 starters from the CAA’s #1 unit in 2018 were voted first team All-Conference. That includes senior linebacker Dmitri Holloway, who finished second in the league with 81 tackles in 2018.  The secondary may have lost Jimmy Moreland to the Redskins and the NFL, but back after missing 2018 with injury is Rashad Robinson (seven interceptions in 2017).

Last year the Dukes kicked off their season with a loss at NC State.  This year’s Power Five trip is to Morgantown, where they’ll visit West Virginia in coach Neal Brown’s debut;  the Mountaineers will also have a new quarterback as Will Grier is gone to the NFL.  Of the five CAA schools in the Preseason Top 25, JMU will not play No. 7 Maine or No. 22 Delaware.  While they visit No. 21 Elon September 28, No. 11 Towson comes to Harrisonburg October 26.

 

Towson (7-5, 5-3 CAA, FCS First Round) is back, by the way.  After missing the tournament for four straight years, Rob Ambrose has the Tigers thinking title.  He’s got a senior quarterback in Tom Flacco, brother of Joe-and no, he’s not thinking about transferring to the University of Denver.  Flacco the Younger threw for 3,237 yards, 27 touchdowns and 1 interceptions while also leading the Tigers with 742 yards rushing.  He’ll lean on a pair of senior Shanes:  running back Shane Simpson (687 yards with six touchdowns rushing last fall) on the ground and wide receiver Shane Leatherbury (67 catches for 885 yards and seven TD’s) in the air.

The team’s ability to deliver on the preseason hype will rest on the shoulders of a defense that finished last against the run and overall in the CAA. New Defensive Coordinator Eric Daniels comes to the Tigers from NAIA school Briar Cliff University (Iowa), where he turned around the Chargers’ defensive woes.  Daniels has a pair of solid building blocks, beginning with senior defensive lineman Bryce Carter (6.5 sacks in 2018) and senior linebacker Robert Heyward (99 tackles plus a fumble recovery).

The schedule serves up a mixed bag.  The other two top projected teams in the CAA are James Madison and Maine, and Towson visits both schools this year.  They do draw Delaware and Elon at home in November, potentially providing coach Ambrose’s team with some necessary late-season momentum if they’re on the FCS Playoff bubble again.

 

Richmond (4-7, 2-6 CAA) did not get any favors from the schedule-makers last year, facing four ranked conference foes.  So instead of contending for an FCS Playoff berth like the previous November, the Spiders saw their first losing season since 2011.  Even with the departure of quarterback Kyle Lauletta to the NFL, coach Russ Huesman’s offense still finished second in the conference in passing.  Junior quarterback Joe Mancuso led the team in rushing while splitting time last fall with Kevin Johnson; this year he’ll be pressed by Air Force transfer Beau English.  Whoever wins the job won’t have Dejon Brissett to throw to, as last year’s top receiver transferred to Virginia. Regardless, ball security will be a priority one autumn after the Spiders lost a CAA-high 27 turnovers.

The defense had issues in 2018, allowing the most points per game in the CAA while ranking last or second to last in most categories. The 4-2-5 formation has been ditched for the 4-3 this fall; no matter how the Spiders line up it all begins with senior defensive lineman Maurice Jackson, who led the CAA with 10 sacks in 2018.

This year’s slate is back-loaded with two bye weeks in September.  How better the turnover/defense issues are will be apparent over a four-week stretch where Richmond faces Delaware, Stonybrook and James Madison.

 

William & Mary (4-6, 3-4 CAA) has a new head coach for the first time since the Carter Administration.  Jimmye Laycock’s retirement brings back a familiar face to both the Commonwealth and the CAA:  former Richmond and Virginia coach Mike London crosses the Potomac after a two-year stint with Howard where he breathed new life in a long-dormant program.  The Tribe is no where near where the Bison were two years ago, but they have posted three consecutive losing seasons and have notched just one winning conference campaign since 2010.

London will find quite a contrast in Williamsburg from the offense he left behind.  The Tribe returns junior quarterback Shon Mitchell and leading rusher Albert Funderburke, but last year W&M ranked last in the CAA in rushing, scoring, total offense, and third down conversions.  Coastal Carolina transfer Kilton Anderson originally played at Fresno State before completing 58% of his passes for 1,010 yards and 8 touchdowns while with the Chanticleers in 2018, proving two things. One-he’s a viable option at QB, and two-I like to work the word “Chanticleers” into conversation way more than one should.

The Tribe return eight starters on defense, with seniors Nate Atkins and Isaiah Laster  the top two tacklers from 2018.  Developing a pass rush (last in sacks) will be a priority for coach London.  The new regime begins August 31 against Lafayette, and the schedule is marked with games against two of London’s former employers: at Virginia September 6 and at Richmmond November 23.  What, they couldn’t add Howard?

 

Howard (4-6, 3-4) will have its fifth head coach this decade as Ron Prince takes over for Mike London. The former Kansas State coach and Michigan assistant steps into quite an offense: quarterback Caylon.  Preseason CAA Offensive Player of the Year Caylin Newton (2,629 yards passing and 504 yards rushing last year) has his top targets back in Jequez Ezzard and Kyle Anthony; Anthony led the MEAC last fall with 53 receptions while Ezzard’s 1,064 yards topped the league.  Running back Dedrick Parson (706 yards with 9 touchdowns rushing) returns to provide a nice counterpunch on the ground.

Coach Prince’s main task this fall will be shoring up a defense that ranked last in the MEAC and concluded the year by allowing 56 points to Bryant.  Bryant!?!  Leading tackler Marcellos Allison is back, as is top pass rusher Zamon Robinson.  The season begins with a bang:  trips to Maryland, Youngstown State and Delaware State plus a showdown with longtime rival Hampton dot the first month.  For some reason, they don’t play the other FCS team located in Washington, DC this year.

 

Georgetown (5-6, 4-2 Patriot League) is coming off of its best season under coach Rob Sgarlata:  their four league wins in 2018 was more than the three posted over his previous four years with the Hoyas.  And this was after being picked to finish not just last in the Patriot but by a country mile.  Heady times indeed.  The difference last fall was a defense that ranked second behind league juggernaut Colgate, and that’s where any hopes of unseating the Raiders begins.  Look no further than a pass rush that led the Patriot League in sacks and interceptions:  senior defensive lineman Kristian Tate (a conference-high 10 sacks last year) along with junior Owen Kessler (6.5) generate most of the heat from the trenches.  Linebacker Wes Bowers (4.5 sacks last season) is more than just a pass rusher, as the junior paced the team with 91 tackles and four interceptions.

While the defense might help them catch Colgate, they only way they’ll pass the Raiders will be if the offense improves from the unit that averaged just 15 points per game in 2018.  Starting quarterback Gunther Johnson returns for his senior season and the Hoyas also get their leading rusher in sophomore running back Herman Moultrie) and top receiver in senior Michael Dereus.