Archives for posts with tag: Hendon Hooker

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Thanksgiving dinner always provides that moment when everyone is full turkey and stuffing when someone decides to start the “let’s go around the table and say what we’re thankful for” chain.  For the record you should go to Thanksgiving dinner with three things (one generic and two specific) in case you’re late in the rotation; nobody likes a copycat.  What I’m thankful for is college football rivalries.

At the highest level it’s Alabama watching its probable playoff hopes go down the drain thanks to missed field goals and pick-sixes at Auburn (although for the record at 10-2 I’m sure the Crimson Tide can still find their way back into the picture).  It’s Michigan losing to Ohio State for a record eighth straight year.  It’s Ole Miss rallying for a last-minute touchdown against Mississippi State, only to miss an extra point after receiving a personal foul penalty because the player who scored the touchdown pretended to urinate in the end zone like a dog (one cannot make this up).  And it’s Virginia putting to bed a generation of mishaps and anguish to bed at long last on a Friday afternoon in Charlottesville.  Fifteen years of woe traded for “Wahoowa!”.

 

Alma Mater Update- the Orange ended their autumn of discontent with a 39-30 overtime win against Wake Forest.  The 5-7 finish will have those looking closer at what could have happened at NC State or against Pitt.  At least thinking about those losses is better than wondering what is up with men’s basketball; a 21-point loss to Penn State ranks with last winter’s loss to Buffalo as a “huh?”.

 

Virginia (9-3, 6-2 ACC) alums may be taking Monday and Tuesday off this week as they’re probably still celebrating after 15 years of close calls and anguish with a 39-30 win over Virginia Tech (8-4, 5-3).  The nine-point margin of victory was the fifth time in eight years the Commonwealth Cup was decided by single digits, and instead of going the Hokies way as has been the case this decade it was the Cavaliers who made the plays down the stretch this year.

Cavalier Congrats: the cape fit once again for Bryce Perkins, who passed for 311 yards and a touchdown while running for 164 yards and a score.  His top target was Hasise Dubois, who made four catches for 139 yards.  The defense posted six sacks, including the one that led to the game-sealing fumble recovery in the Hokies’ end zone.  Noah Taylor tallied a pair of interceptions while Aaron Faumui made 2.5 sacks.  Brian Delaney made game-tying and go-ahead field goals in the fourth quarter.

Cavalier Concerns: Delaney missed his first extra point attempt of the day, and the special teams failed to generate any major returns.  Seven penalties for 62 yards might not hurt you against the Hokies, but they will against Clemson.  And the defense once again was accommodating;  they’ve allowed 29 points per game in November.

Hokie Highlights: Hendon Hooker also threw for 311 yards and a touchdown, and while the sophomore didn’t pass the century mark on the ground he did rush for a TD.  Tre Turner caught seven passes for 134 yards and a score.  Divine Dablo tallied 11 tackles to pace the defense.  Oscar Bradburn averaged 45.8 yards per punt while Tayvion Robinson had a 35 yard punt return while Keshawn King recorded a 43 yard kickoff return.

Hokie Humblings:  the game was theirs in the second half to lose, and the defense that had notched consecutive shutouts allowed the Cavaliers to score on their final four possessions of the day.  The offense that had done a great job taking care of the ball since the 2-2 start turned the ball over twice in the fourth quarter, and the offensive line was ravaged for six sacks by the UVa pass rush.

Next:  for Virginia, it’s a trip to Charlotte for their first-ever ACC Championship Game.  They’ll face defending national champion Clemson at 7:30 p.m.  Virginia Tech plays the waiting game.  The Hokies could potentially appear in the Camping World or Citrus Bowl.

 

Maryland (3-9, 1-8 Big Ten) rallied on the road but came up short in its season finale, falling at Michigan State 19-16.  Head coach Mike Locksley has meetings scheduled with players and coaches over the next few days.  In any program rebuild there’s usually change after the first season, even if it’s considered by the coach as “Year Zero”.

Terrapin Triumphs: Anthony McFarland rushed for 134 yards and a touchdown (a 63-yard scamper that gave Maryland a fourth quarter lead) while also returning a kickoff 40 yards.  Dontay Demus caught seven passes for 96 yards and a 44-yard touchdown.  Fa’Najae Gotay led the defense with 15 tackles, and the unit intercepted Spartans senior quarterback Brian Lewerke twice.  Colton Spangler averaged 47 yards per punt.

Terrapin Troubles: the offense turned the ball on each of their first two possessions and a third quarter fumble jumpstarted the Spartans’ game-tying drive.  In between the Terps converted just 1-of-11 third downs.  The defense didn’t break but bent just enough to allow the game-tying and tie-breaking field goals in the fourth quarter.

Next: Saturday September 5, 2020 at home against Towson.

 

Navy (9-2, 7-1 ACC) wasn’t able to win the AAC West as No. 17 Memphis clinched the division on Friday with their win over No. 18 Cincinnati, but the Midshipmen enter their annual game with arch-rival Army on the high of a 56-41 win over Houston.

Midshipman Medals:  it takes a lot to upstage the play of Malcolm Perry.   But while the senior quarterback rushed for 146 yards and a touchdown while throwing for 107 more yards, runningback Jamale Carothers ran for 188 yards and five TD’s.  The defense intercepted four passes and recovered a fumble.  Kevin Brennan led the unit with seven tackles and one of the five interceptions.

Midshipman Miscues:  the defense allowed 41 points and 527 yards, allowing pass plays of 47, 52, and 67 yards.  Clayton Tune burned them for 393 yards after managing 425 yards over his three previous games in November.

Next: against Army in Philadelphia at 3 p.m. on December 14.

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Halfway through the season, we not only start to trim the list of potential College Football Playoff participants but figure out exactly who the Heisman Trophy candidates are.  Round up the usual suspects:  Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa was the runner-up last year, and this fall he’s joined by his former backup/teammate Jalen Hurts who transferred to Oklahoma.  LSU QB Joe Burrow has been lights out this fall after making a big splash in the Tigers’ win at Texas, and Ohio State’s Justin Fields has picked up where Dwayne Haskins left off.  Wisconsin’s 24-23 loss at Illinois didn’t just torpedo the Badgers’ Big Ten West hopes; Jonathan Taylor’s Heisman candidacy takes a hit.

This should be no surprise; during this decade only one running back has won the award…can you name him?  Yes, I had to look up Alabama’s Derrick Henry too.  Tailbacks used to dominate the balloting, once enjoying a stretch where they won it 11 straight years.  But the 21st century favors the passer, and since 2000 16 of the 19 Heisman winners have been quarterbacks.  Not many are talking about the nation’s leading rusher Chuba Hubbard, who on name value alone is awesome, because even though the Oklahoma State running back has 1,265 yards and 15 touchdowns his Cowboys are 4-3.  Boston College’s A.J. Dillon is second in FBS, but his Eagles are also 4-3.  It’s a pitch and catch world, and the teams making playoff pushes can each air it out.  Sorry, Earl Campbell.

 

Alma Mater Update- the 27-20 loss to Pitt drops the Orange to 3-4.  The season that began in the Top 25 is almost certain to end Thanksgiving weekend.  Instead of wondering about bowl eligibility SU should be wondering if it’s going to go winless in the ACC as there are no soft touches remaining on the slate.  The fun continues at Florida State, a team the Orange torched last fall in the Carrier Dome.  Somehow I don’t think this will be as fun.

 

Maryland (3-4, 1-3 Big Ten) came up short against Indiana 34-28.  The Terps had a pair of chances to take the lead in the final four minutes, but turned the ball over on their final two possessions of the day.  Likewise, the team had two chances to inch closer to bowl eligibility but winds up finding itself three steps shy with a remaining schedule that’s a combined 27-8.

Terrapin Triumphs:  Javon Leake rushed for 153 yards and two touchdowns, the first a 60-yard scamper for a score.  Tyrrell Pigrome threw for 210 yards and two TD’s.  Dontay Demus caught 5 passes for 82 yards and a touchdown.  Chance Campbell tallied ten tackles while Antoine Brooks added seven stops plus and interception.

Terrapin Troubles:  the defense took a while to get in gear, allowing the Hoosiers to reach the end zone the first two times they had the ball.  They also allowed backup quarterback Peyton Ramsey to come in and complete 20 of 27 passes.  While penalties (six this week) were down, the two fourth quarter turnovers killed their comeback hopes.  Ball security by Leake and decision-making by Pigrome need to improve.

Next: Saturday at noon at 7-0 Minnesota.

 

Virginia (5-2, 3-1 ACC) snapped a two-game losing streak by blasting Duke 48-14.  After shutting down the Blue Devils in the first half, the offense scored the first four times they had the ball after intermission.  When Duke did finally score, Joe Reed returned the kickoff back for a UVa touchdown. The season of possibilities is back as they once again stand alone atop the Coastal Division.

Cavalier Congrats: Bryce Perkins ran for three touchdowns while Wayne Taulapapa ran for 78 yards and a score.  Joey Blount tallied 10 tackles and an interception while the defense held the Blue Devils to 2-14 on third down and secured five takeaways.  Brian Delaney made both of his field goals while Reed continues to shine on special teams.

Cavalier Concerns:  Perkins completed just 50% of his passes while tossing an interception.   It was nice to see Chris Moore and Joey Blount finish 1-2 on the team in tackles, but one never likes to see the defensive backs making all the stops.

Next: Saturday at 3:30 p.m. against 4-3 Louisville.

 

Virginia Tech (5-2, 2-2 ACC) needed six overtimes to get by North Carolina, finally prevailing in a 43-41 marathon.  The win gives the Hokies a bit of a bounce entering their bye week, and the fact remains that they control the path to the ACC Championship Game.

Hokie Highlights:  the quarterback carousel paid off, with Hendon Hooker completing 8-12 passes for 127 yards and a touchdown before going down with an injury. Ryan Willis stepped in to throw the go-ahead TD pass in the second quarter. Quincy Patterson II ran for 122 yards and a touchdown in the second half while also tossing a TD pass in overtime.  Rayshard Ashby notched 17 tackles while Jarrod Hewitt added 2.5 sacks.  Oscar Bradburn averaged 49.2 yards per punt.

Hokie Humblings: Brian Johnson missed 41 and 42 yard field goals that would have won the game.  The defense coughed up 348 yards through the air.  The offense lost two of their three fumbles on the afternoon.  Turnovers all but torpedoed the season in September; they’ll have to keep the mistakes to a minimum if they want a November to remember.

Next: November 2 at No. 8 Notre Dame.

 

Navy (5-1, 3-1 AAC) posted another dominant effort, crushing South Florida 35-3.  The difference this fall has been a defense that is much more disruptive than previous units.  The usual offensive efficiency saw Malcolm Perry join Keenan Reynolds, Napoleon McCallum and Chris McCoy as the only Mids to post 3,000 career yards rushing.

Midshipmen Medals: Perry rushed for 188 yards and two touchdowns while the team gains 434 yards on the ground. Diego Fagot notched 10 tackles as the defense tallied five sacks and kept the Bulls out of the end zone.  Owen White averaged 47 yards per punt.

Midshipmen Miscues: Perry’s legs may be legendary, but his arm remains a work in progress after an 0-3 performance that included two interceptions.  Six penalties for 45 yards isn’t a big deal at most schools, but it is at the Academy.

Next: Saturday at 3:30 p.m. against 5-2 Tulane.