Archives for posts with tag: Capital One Arena

The Washington Capitals are Stanley Cup Champions.  It’s been well over a week and the contact high from that sentence still holds.  The Caps are NHL champs for the first time in franchise history…and the DC metro area has its first major pro sports titlist (sorry, DC United and Washington Kastles) since 1992 when the Redskins ruled the roost.  What a journey and what a destination.

Alex Ovechkin can rest knowing he won’t have an asterisk on his career;  the Stanley Cup winning captain leaves the land of Marcel Dionnes and Gilbert Perraults behind.  Unlike a Ray Bourque, Ovechkin didn’t have to benefit from a late-career trade to piggyback another team’s Cup run.  The face of the franchise is a champion without spending another minute in another club’s home dressing room.  Ovechkin got to enjoy the Cup with his long-time teammate Nicklas Backstrom and now can become a rare cradle-to-grave title-winning Washington sports icon.

Barry Trotz can enjoy the professional achievement of winning a Cup after never having coached a game past the second round before this spring.  He can enjoy reaching the peak of his profession and the validation that the system he built in DC was title-worthy after all.  Trotz will also enter the summer knowing that just about every one of his moves (sitting Holtby after a disastrous February, moving Ovechkin and Backstrom to different lines, maximizing Wilson and Eller) this winter paid off in the long run.  He can also appreciate the fact that his contract with the team expired, and he’s going to be paid in DC or elsewhere at a rate commensurate with having led a franchise to their first-ever Stanley Cup.

Brian MacLellan’s Stanley Cup ring won as a player with Calgary finally has a buddy.  The General Manager made multiple moves to pump up a roster that was high on upside but didn’t have a ton of depth and was a disaster on the blue line when he took over.  The midseason trade for Michal Kempny was everything the move for Kevin Shattenkirk last year wasn’t–and worked for precisely that reason.  Seemingly minor pickups like Devante Smith-Pelly became major in the postseason.  Yes, decisions need to be made regarding John Carlson’s expiring deal and next year’s roster will look different–but for at least one day MacLellan can rest easy knowing he’s achieved what he set out to accomplish.  Even if it was year three of the “two year window”.

As for the team, from TJ Oshie to Nathan Walker, from Dmitri Orlov to Christian Djoos, they’re champs.  Pure and simple.  Unlike if the Redskins or Wizards won it all, there’s no precedent.  There are even those who if the Nats win the World Series will cite the 1924 Senators or how the Orioles were the region’s team for three decades.  But this is the first ever title for a franchise that entered the league under sorry circumstances (8-67-5 the byproduct of the slimmest expansion pickings ever)…only to be locked into the toughest division in an era when that was the only path to a title.  Gone are nightmares of Easter Morning.  Gone is the disappointment of coming up short to the Penguins.  This Stanley Cup was also for the Peter Bondras and Mike Gartners and Yvon Labres…players who skated against the windmills of the Patrick Division.  This Cup belongs to the fans who made the trek to the Cap Centre and suffered through the teal eagle sweaters when the team finally moved to DC.  This title belongs to an area that not only was without a champ in a major pro sport since 1992, but had also not played for a title in 20 years (actually it had been 20 years since a DC major pro team had played for the right to play for a championship).

Before the Philadelphia Flyers played Game Six of the Stanley Cup Final in 1974, coach Fred Shero wrote on the dressing room blackboard:  “Win today and we walk together forever.”  They went out and beat Boston to capture the franchise’s first of two Stanley Cups.  The Washington Capitals’ road has been long and winding with more than a few fits and starts, but for one brief shining moment they are the best team in hockey.  And for the rest of time this team will walk-and skate-together forever.

 

 

PORTIONS PREVIOUSLY APPEARING ON WTOP.COM–

Of all years for the Atlantic 10 Tournament to come to DC.  Honestly.  The closest school to Capital One Arena, George Washington, is the 11th seed and might be saying goodbye just as the rest of the league is saying hello.  Fifth seeded George Mason owns a losing record overall, while seventh seeded Richmond is almost guaranteed to have its first sub-500 campaign since 2007.  Thank goodness for VCU…what’s that?  The Rams drop by the district having lost six of nine that includes a 24 point loss at GW?  Rough winter…

Virginia Commonwealth drops by the district with a 17-14 mark–its most losses since Mack McCarthy was guiding the program in 2001.  The last time the Rams failed to win 20?  The 9-9 conference mark is its first non-winning league record since 2000. While previous debut seasons have provided major splashes (Shaka Smart’s 2010 team won the CBI while Anthony Grant’s 2007 club bounced Duke in the NCAA Tournament), former Rams assistant Mike Rhoades’ initial campaign at VCU has been more of a kerplunk.

But the Rams boast a pair of seniors who have known nothing but success- forward Justin Tillman and guard Jonathan Williams have played in three straight A-10 Championship Games (actually, VCU has played for the title every year since joining the conference in 2012-13.  Tillman led the conference with 9.7 rebounds per game and was fifth in the league in scoring (18.9);  he enters the tournament on a roll with five straight double-doubles.  Williams led the Atlantic 10 with 5.7 assists per game while being the catalyst defensively (11th in steals) for the Rams.  Will they get the necessary help from sophomore Di’Riante Jenkins, whose 41.7% accuracy from three-point range ranked 4th in the league but had issues shooting and taking care of the ball in losses down the stretch?

As the #8 seed the Rams face Dayton in the Thursday’s Second Round.  They split the regular season series with the Flyers, losing 106-79 on the road in January (they were down 66-40 at the half) while needing overtime to win 88-84 at home last month (Justin Tillman scored 37 points–including seven of the Rams’ nine in OT).  A potential battle of bigs could emerge as Dayton forward Josh Cunningham leads the A-10 in shooting (.646), but the 6-foot-7 junior has been held to 50 points over his last five games.  Defense may prove to be the difference, as the Flyers hit 63% of their shots while turning the ball over just 11 time in the January win while hitting 44% from the field with 19 turnovers in the February meeting.  Can the Rams dial up a little Shaka Smart/Will Wade/Anthony Grant inspired havoc?