The Major League Baseball universe is decidedly tilted to towards the opposite side of the country in 2017.  The top two teams (Dodgers and Houston) plus four of the top seven squads reside west of the Mississippi, and LA’s magic number for home field is less than the Nats number to win the dilapidated NL East.  Pick your poison- while the Astros boast the major’s best offense (tops in runs, on-base percentage and slugging), the Dodgers-surprise-have the best pitching staff (#1 in ERA and opponent’s batting average).  But Houston’s pitchers lead the league in strikeouts.  If you want to see the best baseball, prepare for later nights (or at least a diet of starts after 8 p.m.).

Dissecting the Division- the Nationals lead the NL East by 14 games after taking four of six games last week, with their magic number dwindling to 27.  Credit the plucky Marlins for keeping pace…as a hot streak would catapult Miami into the serious Wildcard contention (as it is, they’re just six games back).  Speaking of magic numbers, Philadelphia’s “tragic number” is 12.

O’s Woes- the Birds lost four of six…losing both series after taking their first games against Seattle and the Angels.  Two teams ahead of Baltimore in the American League Wildcard race.  A sweep of AL West cellar-dwelling Oakland would be a great boon to their lagging playoff hopes…because after that they visit AL East-leading Boston and then host Wildcard contender Seattle.

Last Week’s Heroes- Wilmer Difo hit .316…while Howie Kendrick scored 5 runs and homered three times.  Daniel Murphy after a day off was responsible for three of the team’s four runs in Sunday’s win at San Diego.  Gio Gonzalez won both of his starts…the only run allowed being unearned.  Sean Doolittle notched three saves in three appearances.  He’s 11 for 11 since coming to the Nats.

Last Week’s Humbled- Matt Wieters is invaluable behind the plate, working very well with pitchers this season.  He was less than valuable at the plate, batting 0-for-14.  Rookie Andrew Stevenson looked more like Andrew Stevens hitting 1-for-10…and Michael A. Taylor has yet to regain his pre-DL groove.  Max Scherzer’s neck is robbing the game’s best pitcher of his stretch run…where is MyPillow.com when you need it?

Games to Watch- yes, games.  With a trip to Houston and a series against the Mets, break out a new bag of Tostito’s hint of lime chips to enjoy with your hummus.  (1) Friday Max Scherzer (neck-willing) pitches against 13-game winner Jacob deGrom. (2) Thursday Stephen Strasburg pitches for the second time since coming off the DL against an 11-2 Dallas Keuchel. (3) Saturday Gio Gonzalez continues his stellar summer ride (5-1 with an ERA of 1.29 since the All Star Break and 3-0 with a 0.46 ERA in August) against the Mets.

Game to Miss- another Sunday day-night doubleheader?  AJ Cole pitches the matinee against Steven Matz (2-7, 6.08 ERA).  Since the break Matz is 0-5 with a 10.16 ERA.

 

 

Saturday’s 21-17 Preseason loss might not eliminate the Redskins from an NFC East Preseason banner…but a lot would need to happen for coach Jay Gruden to capture their first August trophy since 2013.  What is obviously more important is how the team is coming together.  The preseason is such an easy time to write off…or see what one wants to see as a team gets ready for the regular season.  But despite the fact that the Skins went 3-1 in each of coach Gruden’s first three preseasons, his team stumbled out of the gates at 1-2 each fall.  So maybe an 0-2 start in August is a good omen.  Just don’t look at the 2006 team the sleepwalked through the preseason before finishing 5-11 (not too good).

Captain Kirk- now that is what we wanted to see!  More than two possessions!  The franchise tagged one competed 14 of 23 passes for 140 yards and a touchdown while playing the whole first half.  It did take Cousins and the first team a while to find themselves, gaining just 8 net yards over their first 10 plays from scrimmage.  But Cousins finished with the bang of a 10-play, 78-yard march that resulted in a 4-yard TD toss to Jamison Crowder.

Back Up Bingo- the other QB’s mirrored Cousins’ performance, combining to hit 14 of 22 passes for 134 yards and a score.  Colt McCoy directed the Skins to 115 yards on 19 plays  (6.1 yards per play) over three third quarter possessions, while Nate Sudfeld led the team to 81 yards on 15 plays (5.4) over 3 drives.

Running on Empty- the ground game garnered just 64 yards on 22 carries.  Samaje Perine (45 yards on 8 carries plus a 29-yard reception) impressed again after leading the team in rushing against the Ravens (albeit with just 15 yards).  The rest of the running backs?  A less than productive 14 yards on 13 carries.  In coach Jay Gruden’s three previous seasons the team ranked 19th, 20th and then 21st on the ground.  Who’s ready for finishing #22 this fall?

Thompson Time- even though he gained just 1 yard on 2 tries, Chris Thompson made his presence known in the passing game with 5 catches for 52 yards.  In a week without Jordan Reed, the air attack saw some contributions from rookie Robert Davis (4 grabs for 36 yards) and Josh Doctson’s first-ever preseason reception (a 12 yard catch!).  One remains bummed that Ryan Grant (2 catches for 7 yards on 4 targets) has yet to reach his customary August awesomeness.

Third Down and Downer- moving the chains on 6 of 17 attempts is technically better than the 2-for-13 shown last week.  Thank goodness it’s only August.  Cousins converted on 3 of his 9 chances, while Colt McCoy moved the marker on 3 of 5 opportunities.  Nate Sudfeld?  A “he’s just a second-year player 0-for-3”.  The Skins ran 14 pass plays (4-14 conversions) and 3 running plays (2-3).  Yardage breakdown: 4 for 5 when under 4 yards were needed, 1 for 6 when 4 to 6 yards were necessary and 1 for 6 on third and 7+.

Case for the Defense- Chris Carter led the sack pack with 1.5 of the team’s 5 against the Packers…while Zach Virgil and Nico Marley each notched 4 tackles with 3 solo stops to pace the D.  No turnovers for the defense though–and they did allow Green Bay to move the chains on 7 of 15 attempts.  Will Junior Galette ever suit up for this team and will be be the silver bullet they desperately need…especially with Trent Murphy done for 2017?

Special Situations- Niles Paul recovered a fumbled punt…and that resulted in the Skins’ first points of the night.  The return game may have averaged less than 20 yards on kickoffs and less than 5 yards on punts, but the coverage team wasn’t embarrassed either.  Dustin Hopkins connected on a 43-yard attempt and Tress Way averaged over 43 yards per punt.

Nineties Night at Nats Park definitely did not go as planned.  Actually, the whole weekend didn’t go as planned.  Friday’s game with San Francisco was postponed and Saturday’s tilt was delayed…forcing the two teams to play three games in a little over 24 hours.  Let’s just say that Luke Perry didn’t throw out the first pitch on the rescheduled 90’s Night.  Not even Joe E. Tata or the guy who played the Winslow kid on “Family Matters”.

Remember the “Saved by the Bell” episode when Zack injured his knee?  Bryce Harper is more important to the Nats’ title hopes than Mark-Paul Gosselaar.  After slipping on first base Saturday night, the outfielder slips onto the disabled list with a significant bone bruise and hyperextended knee.  Thank goodness no ligaments were torn…although Harper’s agent made comments about slippery bases after rain delays.  File this for the 2018-19 offseason.

Dissecting the Division-  the magic number is now 33 as the Nats own a 14-game lead in the NL East.  Miami’s three-game sweep of Colorado keeps the Marlins not on the fringe of playoff contention, but on the “fringe of the fringe.  They’re 8.5 games behind the Rockies and Arizona for the wildcard, and if those two teams go .500 over the rest of the season Miami would need to finish 31-14.  We aren’t yet to the point where we can pinpoint the champagne celebration, but I’m sure somebody at MASN has a range of dates.

O’s Woes- the Birds climbed back to .500 for the first time since late June with their win last week at the Los Angeles Angels…only to lose two straight against their fellow Wildcard contenders.  Over the weekend against AL West cellar-dwelling Oakland, the Orioles plated 26 runs–only to leave the Bay Area with a split.  While manager Buck Showalter’s team remains 2.5 games out of the final playoff spot in the AL, they still have four teams to pass before they reach the Halos.  The dreaded west coast swing ends with three games against fellow semi-contender (that is…under .500 but still in striking distance of a playoff spot) Seattle.  The Mariners and Angels both come to Camden Yards later this month.

Last Week’s Heroes- Ryan Zimmerman hit .346 with 3 HR and 7 RBI…breaking Tim Wallach’s franchise record of 905 runs batted in.  Brian Goodwin hit .346 with 7 runs scored…and Howie Kendrick hit that grand slam Sunday night.  Gio Gonzalez won his lone start…allowing one run over 7 innings just two days after the birth of his son.  Sean Doolittle notched 3 saves.

Last Week’s Humbled- Matt Wieters hit .176…while Anthony Rendon hit .130.  AJ Cole went 0-2 with an ERA of 5.73 while Joe Blanton recorded another double-digit ERA for the week (13.50).  The way the weekend was handled amidst the weather was less than ideal;  many of the players had already changed into streetclothes and were leaving the stadium by the time the game was called at 9:48 p.m.  Instead of playing Saturday afternoon (where it did not rain in the area), they played Saturday night (and was delayed three hours) and Sundays day-night doubleheader gave the Giants a great lift as they had to leave for a series in Miami.

Game to Watch- the journey of Edwin Jackson resumes Thursday in San Diego against one of the pitcher’s 11 former teams.  The 33-year old is 3-2 over five starts with the Nats…posting an ERA of 3.30 and a strikeout to walk ratio of 25-to-7.  Problem is, Jackson hasn’t won consecutive starts since August of last year.  Which Edwin will we get?

Game to Miss- another tough call.  You don’t want to miss the two home games against the Wildcard contending Los Angeles Angels.  And even though Max Scherzer pitches at 10:10 on Friday night, every one of his outings is a must-see.  And could we be seeing Stephen Strasburg returning Saturday?  Sorry, Gio Gonzalez–your Sunday start against the Padres draws the short straw.

So much for a Preseason banner.  The franchise that has treated us to three straight 3-1 Augusts under coach Jay Gruden is in danger of its first non-winning preseason since 2010.  On the bright side, it’s August.  Many of the players you saw in Thursday’s 23-3 loss at Baltimore will not be around September 10th when Philadelphia drops by Fed Ex Field.  So there’s that.  Also, many of the players expected to be major contributors either saw minimal snaps (Kirk Cousins) or didn’t play at all (Junior Galette) against the Ravens.  Lastly, as it was an interconference loss the Skins would still look pretty good on tiebreakers for an NFC East Preseason title.  As dominant as they’ve been this decade (21-8), the Burgundy and Gold haven’t been the top division team in August since they went 4-0 in 2013.

 

Captain Kirk- the franchise tagged one played just two series, completing 1-2 passes for 5 yards and got sacked once.  He completed no passes to Jordan Reed (who didn’t play) and couldn’t find Josh Doctston downfield (he also sat).  Minus his usual array of weapons and a small sample size, this wasn’t as impressive as last year’s 5-for-5.  But it’s only August.

Backups Back Up- instead of thrilling us like Colt Brennan or the legendary Babe Laufenberg, the Skins backups combined to complete 11 of 25 passes for 108 yards and an interception.  Don’t Colt McCoy and Nate Sudfeld know that this is August?  That’s when Ryan Grant explodes for 5 catches and 100 yards!  Instead, the perennial preseason star notched just one grab for 17–although it did lead to one of the team’s eight first downs.

First Half Glass Half Empty- if you write off the second half as the back ends of both rosters saw the majority of playing time after intermission, they gained just 48 yards on 24 plays from scrimmage in the first and second quarters.  The Ravens? A robust 155 yards on 39 plays.  So the D wasn’t exactly rock-solid either.  Repeat after me: it’s only August.

Running on Empty- the ground game gained just 39 yards on 18 carries…with Samaje Perine leading the way with 15 yards on 6 tries.  But the rookie from Oklahoma also fumbled, dropped a pass and struggled in pass protection.  Decidedly less than ideal…even if it is only August.

Three &…it’s only August- the Burgundy and Gold converted just 2 of 13 third downs against the Ravens.  QB breakdown:  Cousins was sacked, Colt McCoy went 2-4 with one conversion, and Nate Sudfeld went 0-4 with a punt-inducing sack.  Run-pass comparison:  1 for 2 on runs and 1 for 11 on pass plays.  Yardage:  1-3 on short-yardage, 0-3 on medium yardage (in between 4 and 6 yards needed to move the chains) and 1-7 on long-yardage.

Defensively- they did hold the Ravens to 5-15 on third down.  If there was one achilles last year for this defense that did not involve Junior Galette, it was the team’s inability to get off the field on third down.  Zach Virgil and Josh Harvey-Clemons led the D with six stops apiece…while Nico Marley tallied four tackles and a sack.  Zach Brown also had four stops…and gives me hope that I can use his weekly performances to talk “Saved by the Bell”.

Special Situations- remember just a few years ago when the Skins’ kicking game was a nightmare?  Not so in 2017…as Dustin Hopkins connects from 49 yards in his only field goal attempt.  Tress Way punted nine times for an average of 46 yards per kick…and the return game averaged just under 20 yards on kickoffs and 10 yards on punts.  Kick coverage was solid (10 yards per return)…and despite Keenan Reynolds 46 yard punt return, the punt coverage wasn’t embarrassing.  I like the fact that only 2 of Way’s 9 punts were returned…although the 2 touchbacks were less than ideal.

Flying Flags- 7 penalties for 91 yards.  Again, many of these infractions are by players who will not be here this time next month.  So we move on…unless it gets worse as the regulars play more.

Injuries- the defense took a hit with Trent Murphy and Su’ah Cravens both suffering knee injuries.  No word on the severity of either.  The team was going to miss Murphy anyway with the linebacker serving a suspension for PED’s from weeks one through four of the regular season…but the loss of Cravens hurts as the converted linebacker still has strides to make settling into his new position.

One more weekend in Richmond- the team finishes its stay in the Commonwealth’s capital with workouts Saturday and Sunday.

Well, that was a week you don’t often see.  The Nationals began the week with a trading deadline deal that yielded a third reliever in less than a month…and then saw Gio Gonzalez take a no-hitter into the ninth inning.  Max Scherzer hits a home run…but then has to leave the game due to a bad neck (buy him one of those My Pillows pronto).  Tanner Roark stands on his head at Wrigley Field…and the Nats get a clutch hit from their catcher when all looks lost.  Not the week you want to start your final book of the summer, “Shattered”, which to my disappointment was NOT about the Rolling Stones’ “Some Girls” recording sessions and instead covers the 2016 Presidential Election.  But after a 3-3 week that provided a little of everything, the Nats are over two-thirds of the way through their regular season marathon.  Will the moves of the last month help them for the October sprint?

Nats Dissecting the Division- The magic number is now 41 games!  The Nats’ lead stays at a lucky 13 games over Miami as the Marlins drop two of three to Atlanta after taking two of three from the Nationals.  At 52-57, the NL East’s second-place team also stands 10 games back in the wildcard race.   The two teams tangle four times this week.

O’s Position- thought by many to be in the “seller’s mode” at the trading deadline, the Orioles actually made moves- bringing in starting pitcher Jeremy Hellickson and infielder Tim Markham.  Both moves have paid in the short-term…and at 55-56 the Birds are within striking distance (2.5 games back in the wildcard) but is another one-game playoff worth it for the organization to tread on .500 water for another season?  The barren farm system could have used an infusion of prospects.  On a macro level, is an organization that doesn’t have a robust farm system a symptom or a cause of the issues at the Major League level?  And is the lack of homegrown talent because of bad drafting or poor development?  One feels like manager Buck Showalter is trying to swim through the shark-infested waters of the AL East while being tethered to an anvil.

Last Week’s Heroes- Gio Gonzalez tossed a near no-hitter on the birthday of his late friend Jose Fernandez.  Daniel Murphy hit .389 with a team-high 6 runs and 2 HR, while Howie Kendrick provided a boost by batting .471.  Tanner Roark turned into the stopper of the staff with his outing Friday night, and Matt Wieters’ grand slam Sunday salvaged their series in Chicago.

Last Week’s Humbled- Max Scherzer’s bad neck turned their series with Miami on its ear:  they had outscored the Marlins 7-0 before the neck and were outscored 14-0 after Scherzer sat down.  The bad neck also blew up the bullpen for the next few days.  Talking about the bullpen, Matt Grace and Matt Albers each posted ERA’s in the double-digits.  At the plate, Ryan Zimmerman hit .100 and his primary backup Adam Lind batted .063 (for those scoring at home, that’s a combined 3-for-36 with 10 K’s).

Game to Watch- Saturday the Nats host San Francisco with Max Scherzer (hopefully) taking to the mound against Jeff Samardija.  Plenty of heat available on South Capitol Street.

Game to Miss- Friday Edwin Jackson starts against the Giants Chris Stratton (0-2, 6.63 ERA).  It’s also “Nineties Night” at the ballpark.  I swore Ricky Stratton and Silver Spoons was canceled in the late 80’s.

With the Moody Blues touring in celebration of their landmark album “Days of Future Passed”…we’ve been going through the archives.  

The fall of 1967 meant awaiting the Christmas offerings of the Beatles and Rolling Stonesto much disappointment. “Magical Mystery Tour” was merely an EP that served as a soundtrack to the Fab Four’s first misstep–a drug enduced home movie that shocked many and confused more on Boxing Day…while “Their Satanic Majesties Request” saw what happened when the Rolling Stones tried to imitate “Sgt. Pepper” instead of “Aftermath”–a psychedelic journey that never really began or ended with a Bill Wyman song to boot. Nobody expected greatness from a has-been band almost named after a brewery just a few years before. But that’s what they got with the Moody Blues “Days of Future Passed”.

A revamped lineup, a change of musical focus and consecutive singles that fail to chart is not the ideal way for a musical group to rebound from a two-year slump. Although neither “Fly Me High” nor “Love and Beauty” made a dent in the UK top 20, Deram Records thought they had something– guinea pigs. Recording at the time was making the move into stereo…and the label thought it would be great to have a demo of what stereo would sound like with classical and modern music. So naturally, they asked the Moody Blues to record and adaptation of Antonín Dvořák’s Symphony No. 9. Kind of like an aspiring painter asked to reproduce something they saw in art class, but with different paints to show off a new canvas.

Fortunately for the group, they were writing quite a bit of new material while touring in Belgium…and were able to narrow the fruits of their creativity into a song cycle about “a day in the life”. Mike Pinder had sat in on one of the Sgt. Pepper sessions for that Beatles song–and perhaps that got things rolling. But it wasn’t just Pinder who contributed songs: Hayward, Lodge and Thomas also wrote while Graeme Edge composed the two poems that bookend the album:

“Cold hearted orb that rules the night…remove the colors from our sight. Red is grey and yellow white…but we decide which is right. And which is an illusion…”

The spoken word poems, however goofy-sounding at times (and depending on your mood they range from profound to downright ridiculous) hold key posts in the groups first five “core” albums (with grunting emerging in their sixth)…setting the table (In Search of the Lost Chord’s “Departure”) or providing a finishing statement (A Question of Balance’s “The Balance”). In Days similar verses open and end a journey through the day.

It was a marriage of rock and classical music like none other. Peter Knight directed the “London Festival Orchestra” to fill the gaps in between songs moving through different day parts. The opening track “Day Begins” touches on different melodies we’ll hear later on the album…and the orchestral pieces mesh perfectly with the songs. Credit producer Tony Clarke with fitting the two genres in tandem.

“Dawn is a Feeling” wakes up the listener to the possibilities of the day ahead…even sneaking in a subtle narcotic hint (“the smell of grass just makes you pass into a dream”)…Hayward and Pinder trading verses and bridges. Justin’s sunshiny pleasantness would provide the Yin to Mike’s soul-searching Yang over the next seven years. “Another Morning” offers the double-tracked voice of Ray Thomas (also known as the dancing machine in the group’s “Ride My See Saw” video”) and no question about it, the Moodies’ flautist vocally dances through whimsical lyrics “a palace is an orange box”…with the key line “time seems to stand quite still–in a child’s world it always will”. “Peak Hour” brings John Lodge into the mix with a up-tempo rocker that ends the first side that showcases Graeme Edge’s accelerating drum solo that instantly makes one think of his intro “I’m Just a Singer (in a rock and roll band)” five years later.

“Tuesday Afternoon” opens side two with the hypnotic combination of Mellotron/bass for the first few bars…and by the time Hayward’s vocal starts and the guitar and drums kick in, the listener is lost in an audio undertow. “Evening (Time to Get Away)” lets us know Lodge has a falsetto in his arsenal and isn’t afraid to use it. “Sunset/Twilight Time” juxtaposes Pinder and Thomas effectively. Booming drums with an Oriental flavor set the tone underneath Mike’s initial vocal…and then Ray’s flute answers the Mellotron in between the verses. After Hayward’s guitar plays the introductory note to “Twilight Time” Thomas’ fall away jumper of a vocal boasts the lyrical gem “an aerial display of a firefly brigade…dancing to tunes no one knew”.

The final song remains 46 years later the group’s signature tune…”Nights in White Satin”. Reportedly inspired when he received satin sheets as a gift, Justin Hayward captures the heart of chances not taken (“letters I’ve written, never meaning to send”)…before being given confidence from Pinder’s Mellotron to declare his feelings. Thomas’ flute enters side by side with Lodge’s bass and Hayward’s acoustic guitar as support during the bridge. A tidal wave of emotion crashes with each line…and for a guy who was only meaning to send letters, Hayward delivers “I love you” no fewer than 15 times before the orchestra kicks in. I hope he bought forever stamps.

“Nights in White Satin” would chart three separate times (#19 in 1967, #9 in 1972 and #14 in 1979) in the UK and reach #2 in the US in 1972 (topping the charts in Canada that year) while taking #1 in the “Cashbox Chart” (the ESPN/USA Today Poll to Billboard’s AP) the same year. “Nights” would serve as scene-setters for movies set in the 1960’s like “Bobby” and “A Bronx Tale” while showing up in “Deuce Bigelow: European Gigelo”. TV shows from “Fringe” to “Two and a Half Men” would use “Nights” for emphasis.

Titled “Days of Future Passed”–and often misspelled “Past”–by the record company (the last time that would happen for the Moodies)…the album would see moderate success in the homeland (#27) while taking off on this side of the Atlantic (#3 in the US and Canada)…and the Moodies would make more than a few trips to America over the next few years. The album’s success ended a two-year descent and gave the group a blueprint they’d go back to six more times over the next four years.

Coming Up Next–How did they lose the chord in the first place?

With the Moody Blues touring and playing their 1967 landmark album “Days of Future Passed”, I’m returning to the archives for the first four parts of a summer-long series from 2013.  Eventually I’ll add pieces and bring us to the present…whether you like it or not.

 

1966 was an incredible year in music. The Beatles released their highly regarded Revolver while the Rolling Stones were spinning out singles like “19th Nervous Breakdown” and groups like Cream and the Jefferson Airplane were beginning to take flight.  Meanwhile, the Moody Blues were on their way to becoming insignificant one-hit wonders (GO NOW!, #1, 1965)–about to be devoured by the law of diminishing returns.  To add to their drifting into oblivion…the Moodies lost their rudder and sail as lead singer Denny Laine and bassist Clint Warwick fled the sinking ship.  As a last gasp the remaining trio reached into their past and future.

John Lodge had originally left the Moodies to attend technical college…but rejoined at this time as fill-in Rodney Clarke didn’t last long enough to merit a Wikipedia entry.  Lodge’s voice and songwriting would be an unexpected bonus to his bass playing:  he’d create and deliver band-defining songs from “Ride My See-Saw” to “Isn’t Live Strange”.  For a new lead guitarist, the band picked up a hand me down from the Animals:  Eric Burdon handed Mike Pinder a letter and demo from 20-year old Justin Hayward.  The sandy blonde songwriter had previously been a part of the “Wilde Three” and had done some solo work…and would go on to become the face and voice of the Moodies during their peak era of 1967-72.

Armed with two singer/songwriters, the band refined its sound.  R&B knockoffs wouldn’t work any more in a changing musical landscape.  The quintet grew together playing in Belgium–now focused on their own material.  The first fruit of their cross-pollination would be one step forward with “Fly Me High”…a Justin Hayward song that drives though the verses steadily before relying on John Lodge’s falsetto harmony in the bridges.  The kind of song where you enjoy the entire ride and are bummed when it’s over… thinking for sure you had one more verse to enjoy.  The B side would be a leftover from the Laine/Warwick days, “I Really Haven’t Got the Time”.  A song that feels like a Gerry and the Pacemakers derivative…only not as good. Thankfully, Mike Pinder’s next effort wouldn’t only be much better, but also feature a new instrument that would define the band.

“Love and Beauty” was the band’s next single…and in addition to featuring interwoven harmonies Mike Pinder swapped out his piano for the Mellotron. He discovered the instrument while an employee of Streetly Electronics. This keyboard instrument plays tape loops and gave bands the feel of an orchestra at times. It provided the perfect vessel for the band to take their listeners on seven remarkable journeys.


Coming up Next: One Incredible Day.